Overview

Brief Summary

Biology

Little is known of the biology of the Leeward Island racer. It is diurnal, hunting for small lizards, frogs and turtles during the day and lying in the sun. It is more active in the rainy season and rarely seen during the dry season (2).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

This medium-sized snake has a pointed head and pale to chocolate brown skin, fading to pale yellowish-pink or brown on the underside. Some have black markings across the body and a darker brown stripe can be seen running from the nostrils through the eyes to the neck. Juveniles have a particularly pointed tail and a dark V-shape on the head (2).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Continent: Caribbean
Distribution: Anguilla, St. Martin (= St. Maarten), St. Barthelemy, Guadeloupe, Netherlands Antilles  
Type locality: St.-Martin and Anguilla.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Peter Uetz

Source: The Reptile Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Range

Found in low numbers on St Martin and St Bartholomew Islands in the Lesser Antilles, and on Anguilla (1) (4).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Systems
  • Terrestrial
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Inhabits humid rocky crevices and cracks in walls and may also be found in piles of leaves and occasionally in trees. It is rarely seen in open spaces (2).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EN
Endangered

Red List Criteria
A2ce

Version
2.3

Year Assessed
1996
  • Needs updating

Assessor/s
Day, M.

Reviewer/s

Contributor/s

History
  • 1994
    Vulnerable
    (Groombridge 1994)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Status

The Leeward Island racer is classified as Endangered (EN A2ce, B1 + 2ce) on the IUCN Red List 2004 (1) and is listed on Appendix III of the Berne Convention on the Conservation of European Wildlife and Natural Habitats (3).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

The Leeward Island racer population is declining and has become extinct in some areas. This is due to a combination of predation by introduced rats, cats and mongooses, the burning of vegetation for agriculture and persecution by man (2).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation

One of the rarest snakes of the Lesser Antilles, the Leeward Island racer will only survive if introduced predators are exterminated from its range (2).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Wildscreen

Source: ARKive

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!