Overview

Brief Summary

Fitchi's anole

Anolis fitchi is an olive green to tan lizard with transverse dark brown bands on the back, and sometimes with yellow or black spots on the sides. Females may show a tan or cream color vertebral stripe (common in females of many Anolis species). The belly in both sexes may be cream, light brown or yellowish-green. Males have a large dewlap, extending up to the middle of the belly; females have a smaller dewlap, extending only to the arm insertion. In males, the dewlap is dark brown (in some cases with yellow in the anterior edge), with distinctive rows of one or two green or yellowish green scales, clearly separated by naked skin. In females the dewlap is tan or pale brown, mottled or spotted dark brown. Members of this species exhibit a moderate body size (maximum male snout-to-vent length [SVL] = 91mm, maximum female SVL = 86mm), narrow toe lamellae with the subdigital pad under the third phalanx projecting above the proximal end of the second phalanx. The iris has been reported as dark brown, gray or blue in males; in females it has been reported as blue or blue-green.

  • Ayala-Varela, F. and A. Carvajal-Campos. 2010. Anolis fitchi. In: O. Torres-Carvajal (ed). Reptiles de Ecuador, V. 2.0. Museo de Zoología, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador, Quito, Ecuador. http://zoologia.puce.edu.ec/vertebrados/reptiles/FichaEspecie.aspx?Id=544. Accessed March 7, 2012.
  • Williams, E.E. and W.E. Duellman. 1984. Anolis fitchi, a new species of the Anolis aequatorialis group from Ecuador and Colombia. In: R.A. Siegler, L.E. Hunt, J.L. Knight, L. Malaret, and N.L. Zuschlag (eds.), Vertebrate ecology and systematics–A tribute to Henry S. Fitch. Special Publications No. 10. Pp. 257–266. The University of Kansas, Museum of Natural History, Laurence, Kansas, USA.

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Distribution

Range Description

This species is found from the department of Putumayo in Colombia, to the state of Tungurahua in Ecuador (Williams and Duellman 1984, Ayala-Varela and Torres-Carvajal 2010). This species is found between 250 and 2,000 m above sea level.
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Source: IUCN

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Continent: South-America
Distribution: Colombia (Putumayo), Ecuador (Napo)  
Type locality: Ecuador, Napo, 16.5 km N NE of Santa Rosa
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Source: The Reptile Database

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Physical Description

Type Information

Paratype for Anolis fitchi
Catalog Number: USNM 214870
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles
Preparation: Ethanol
Year Collected: 1962
Locality: La Alegria, on Río Chingual, ca. 3 km N of Sebundoy and ca. 20 km N of La Bonita, Napo, Ecuador, South America
Elevation (m): 1904 to 1904
  • Paratype: Williams, E. E. & Duellman, W. E. Vertebrate Ecology and Systematics - A Tribute to Henry S. Fitch. 257.
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Paratype for Anolis fitchi
Catalog Number: USNM 214869
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles
Preparation: Ethanol
Locality: Alto Río Napo, region of, Napo, Ecuador, South America
  • Paratype: Williams, E. E. & Duellman, W. E. Vertebrate Ecology and Systematics - A Tribute to Henry S. Fitch. 257.
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, Division of Amphibians & Reptiles

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species is found in montane forest habitat.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Source: IUCN

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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2011

Assessor/s
Castañeda, R.M., Castro, F. & Mayer, G.C.

Reviewer/s
Böhm, M., Collen, B. & Ram, M.

Contributor/s
De Silva, R., Milligan, H.T., Wearn, O.R., Wren, S., Zamin, T., Sears, J., Wilson, P., Lewis, S., Lintott, P. & Powney, G.

Justification
Anolis fitchi is listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, and because it is unlikely to undergo significant population declines to qualify for listing in a more threatened category. Monitoring is required to ensure that the localized threats do not become more widespread, so that a significant decline in the abundance of A. fitchi triggers allocation to an appropriate threat category.
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Population

Population
There are no population data available for this species.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
Habitat degradation and loss as a result of agricultural expansion and mining is occurring in localized regions of this species' range. Habitat alteration in the region is occurring at a fast rate as a result of oil exploration and cattle farming (F. Castro pers. comm. 2010), so this may need to be monitored to determine future impacts on this species.
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Source: IUCN

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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no known species-specific conservation measures in place for this species, however, in places its distribution coincides with protected areas, probably providing small safeguards. Monitoring of populations and habitat is required to ensure that the localized threats do not become more widespread.
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Source: IUCN

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