Overview

Comprehensive Description

Brief

Scales in 23-25 rows. Ventrals (122)137-159; anal divided; Subcaudals 49-72 paired.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Range Description

This species as currently defined occurs in coastal South Asia, peninsular India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Myanmar, the Andaman Islands, eastward to the coastal areas of the Indochinese and Malaysian Peninsulas, southwards into Indonesia and eastwards to Palau and Micronesia (Murphy 2007).
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Coasts and river estuaries of India
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Type Locality

Southeast India, Orissa State

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Siler, Cameron

Source: Amphibians and Reptiles of the Philippines

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Faunal Affinity

Widely distributed in the Philippines.

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Siler, Cameron

Source: Amphibians and Reptiles of the Philippines

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

This is a widely distributed species of snake, currently recognized to occur in Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Vietnam, and the Philippine islands. In the Philippines this species occurs throughout most major faunal regions.

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Siler, Cameron

Source: Amphibians and Reptiles of the Philippines

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Continent: Asia Australia
Distribution: Australia (North Territory, Queensland, West Australia), New Guinea, Indonesia (Ambon, Babi, Bacan = Batjan, Bali, Bangka, Borneo, Buru, Butung, Dolak, Enggano, Flores, Goram, Halmahera, Irian Jaya, Java, Kalimantan, Lombok, Mentawai Archipelago, Nako, Natuna Archipelago, Nias, Riau Archipelago, Roti, Sangihe Archipelago, Saparua, Seram, Simeulue, Sulawesi, Sula Archipelago, Sumatra, Sumba, Sumbawa, Talaud Archipelago, Ternate, Timor, We, Wetar, Komodo);  Bangladesh;  Cambodia;  India (Gujarat etc.; including Andaman and Nicobar Islands);  Malaysia (Malaya and East Malaysia, incl. Pulau Tioman);  Burma (Myanmar);  Philippine Islands (including Palawan, Panay, Luzon); Singapore; Sri Lanka; Thailand; Vietnam  novaeguineae: Indonesia (Irian Jaya).  
Type locality: “Ganjam” (Orissa State, SE India)
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Peter Uetz

Source: The Reptile Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

coastal
  • UNESCO-IOC Register of Marine Organisms
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The species inhabits a variety of coastal habitats including mangrove forests, mudflats, tidal creeks, estuaries, rivers and sometimes coral reefs. It is most frequently found in salt and brackish waters but may venture into freshwater. It also appears to be tolerant of human activity. This species is nocturnal (Murphy 2007). The species feeds mostly on small fish and possibly crustaceans (Heatwole 1999). The South Asian populations feed on frogs (A. Lobo pers. comm. 2009).

Systems
  • Freshwater
  • Marine
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

General Habitat

In and around Waterbodies
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2010

Assessor/s
Murphy, J.

Reviewer/s
Livingstone, S.R., Elfes, C.T., Polidoro, B.A. & Carpenter, K.E. (Global Marine Species Assessment Coordinating Team)

Contributor/s

Justification
This species has a wide distribution and is abundant in many of its localities across the range. This species thrives in human areas such as fishing villages. There has been historic collection of this species for skins but this apparently no longer happens. This species has therefore been listed as Least Concern.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
This species is abundant in many localities across its range (Murphy 2007). It is particularly abundant in areas of human fishing and fish cleaning activities (Murphy 2007). Jayne et al. (1988) had an 80,000 m² study site at Muar, Peninsular Malaysia, and estimated 374-1,396 individuals. The sub-adult population was estimated to be one to three snakes per linear metre of shoreline.

Population Trend
Unknown
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
This species has historically been collected for its skin in the Philippines (Gaulke 1998). But, it is no longer being collected for skins in the Philippines (J. Gatus pers. comm. 2009). In 1993 it was reported that 775,000 skins were found in the leather trade in Indonesia (Lilley 1993). It is unclear if there is continued use of the species for leather in Indonesia.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is listed on Appendix II of CITES. In India, this species is protected under the Indian Wildlife Act (1972), due to its historic trade as skin.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Cerberus rynchops

The New Guinea bockadam or dog-faced water snake, Cerberus rynchops, is a species of a colubrid snake found in coastal waters of Asia and Australia.

C. rynchops is commonly found in mangroves, mudflats, streams, ponds, tidal pools, on algae patches, and has even been found burrowing into the mud. C. rynchops is rear-fanged and is mildly venomous. An aquatic and nocturnal snake, it feeds mainly on fish and is known to consume eels.

In captivity, it is observed to move in a sidewinding direction on land. In the BBC series 'Life in Cold Blood' it was filmed adapting this sidewinding technique to jump across a mudflat in Singapore ( up until then no snakes were considered able to truly jump ). It also has a prehensile tail that would suggest it could climb mangrove trees. It is now known to give birth to live young, numbering from 8 to 30, either in water or on land.

It is a quite docile, mild-tempered and a hardy snake; in recent years it has become a welcome addition to snake hobbyists in the Philippines. It also owes its popularity to its bright yellow to orange belly coloring, mostly of females.

Scalation

Description[edit]

The visibility of upper jaw, giving it a dog-like appearance. Head long and distinct from neck. Eyes small and beadly, with rounded pupil. Dorsum dark gray, with faint dark blotches and a dark line along the sides of the head, across the yes. Venter cream with two distinct rows of large, diffuse dark gray spots.

Scalation[edit]

Scales are distinctly keeled. Midbody scale rows 21-25. Ventrals 132-160. Subcaudals 49-72.

Distribution[edit]

This is a saltwater-tolerant species found in Australia (North Territory, Queensland, West Australia), New Guinea, Indonesia (Ambon, Babi, Bacan = Batjan, Bali, Bangka, Buru, Butung, Dolak, Enggano, Flores, Goram, Halmahera, Java, Kalimantan, Lombok, Mentawai Archipelago, Nako, Natuna Archipelago, Nias, Riau Archipelago, Roti, Sangihe Archipelago, Saparua, Seram, Simeulue, Singapore, Sulawesi, Sula Archipelago, Sumatra, Sumba, Sumbawa, Talaud Archipelago, Ternate, Timor, We, Western New Guinea, Wetar); Bangladesh, Cambodia, India (including Andaman and Nicobar Islands), Malaysia (Malaya and East Malaysia, including Pulau Tioman), Burma (Myanmar), Philippine Islands (including Palawan, Panay, Luzon), Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vietnam. Race novaeguinea is found in Indonesia (western New Guinea). Type locality: "Ganjam" (Orissa State, SE India)

Dog-faced Water Snake, Sundarban, India

References[edit]

  • Boulenger, George A. 1890 The Fauna of British India, Including Ceylon and Burma. Reptilia and Batrachia. Taylor & Francis, London, xviii, 541 pp.
  • Karns,D.R.; O'Bannon,A.; Voris,H.K. & Weigt,L.A. 2000 Biogeographical implications of mitochondrial DNA variation in the Bockadam snake (Cerberus rynchops, Serpentes, Homalopsinae) in Southeast Asia. J. Biogeography 27: 391–402
  • Schneider, J. G. 1799 Historiae Amphibiorum narturalis et literariae. Fasciculus primus, continens Ranas. Calamitas, Bufones, Salamandras et Hydros. Jena, 266 S.
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!