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Overview

Distribution

Hebei, Heilongjiang, Jilin, Nei Mongol, Xinjiang [N Mongolia, Russia (Siberia)].
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Shrubs or rarely small trees, deciduous, 2–4 m tall, usually thorny; thorns ca. 1 cm, sometimes absent. Branchlets purplish brown when young, grayish brown when old, terete, sparsely pubescent when young, soon glabrous; buds purplish brown, triangular-ovoid, glabrous. Stipules falcate or irregularly cordate, 5–7 mm, herbaceous, glabrous, margin serrate, apex acute; petiole 1.5–2 cm, subglabrous; leaf blade broadly ovate or rhombic-ovate, 5–6 × 3.5–4.5 cm, abaxially sparsely pubescent along veins, adaxially pubescent, base cuneate, margin doubly serrate, with (2 or)3–5 pairs of shallow lobes, apex acute. Corymb 2–3 cm in diam., many flowered; peduncle glabrous, subglabrous; bracts caducous, linear, membranous. Pedicel 5–6 mm, glabrous or subglabrous. Flowers ca. 8 mm in diam. Hypanthium campanulate, glabrous. Sepals triangular-ovate, ca. 4 mm, abaxially sparsely pubescent. Petals white, oblong, 5–6 mm. Stamens 20. Ovary pubescent apically, 3–5-loculed, with 2 ovules per locule; styles 3(–5). Pome red, subglobose, ca. 1 cm in diam., glabrous; sepals persistent, reflexed; pyrenes 3, rarely 5, with concave scars on both inner sides. Fl. May–Jun, fr. Jul–Aug. 2n = 51*, 68*.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Mespilus purpurea Poiret; M. sanguinea Spach.
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Ecology

Habitat

Slopes, mixed river side forests; 900--3000 m.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Crataegus sanguinea

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 11
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

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Wikipedia

Crataegus sanguinea

Crataegus sanguinea (common names Redhaw Hawthorn or Siberian hawthorn) is a species of hawthorn that is native to southern Siberia, Mongolia, and the extreme north of China. It is cultivated for its edible red berry-like fruit which actually is a pome. The fruit can be eaten raw or cooked. They can be used to make jam, jelly, and fruit preserves. They are also grown in gardens as ornamental plants. The flowers are small, white in color, and occur in clusters. The flowers give off a carrion smell.

The world's largest living individual of this species can be found in Volunteer Park, Seattle, Washington.[2]

References and external links[edit]

  1. ^ Phipps, J.B., O’Kennon, R.J., Lance, R.W. (2003). Hawthorns and medlars. Royal Horticultural Society, Cambridge, U.K.
  2. ^ Arthur Lee Jacobson (2001). "Trees of Volunteer Park". 
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