Overview

Comprehensive Description

Biology

Eutropis multifasciata is the largest species of Eutropis that occurs in the Philippines, and is not closely related to the other species in the Philippine radiation. It exhibits a broad geographic range throughout Southeast Asia, with little genetic differentiation across this range. E. multifasciata appears to have excellent dispersal abilities both through natural and human mediated means. It is one of the more conspicuous lizards in this area of the world due to it's size, as well as because it is diurnally active and thrives in disturbed lowland habitats.

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Description

Eutropis multifasciata can be distinguished from congeners by the following combination of characters: (1) body size large (SVL 75-140 mm for mature adults); (2) head scales smooth; (3) dorsal scales with 3 weak keels; (4) 38-48 vertebral scale rows between parietals and base of tail; (5) midbody scale rows 30-34; (6) 16-21 lamellae between 4th toe; (7) prefrontals in broad contact; (8) 6-8 lamellae beneath 1st toe; (9) supranasals narrowly separated at midline; (10) 6 or 7 upper and lower labials; (11) ear moderate in size, deeply sunk with 1 to several lobules on anterior margin (Brown & Alcala, 1980).

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Distribution

Type Locality

Type locality not given in original description; type repository unknown

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Faunal Affinity

This species is recognized to occur throughout the Philippines, India, much of southeast Asia, and the East Indies.

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Eutropis multifasciata is broadly distributed in Southeast Asia, on the mainland throughout India, China, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Singapore, Peninsular Malaysia, as well as throughout the Malaysian, Indonesian, and Philippine Archipelago's, New Guinea, and Palau

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Continent: Asia
Distribution: From India (Assam) to S China (Taiwan, Hainan, Yunnan) Thailand (incl. Phuket), Myanmar (= Burma), Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam,  Malaysian Peninsula (West Malaysia), Pulau Tioman, Johor: Pulau Besar, Pulau Sibu, Singapore,  Indonesia (Borneo, Sumatra, Java, Bali, Komodo, Sulawesi),  New Guinea, Philippine Islands (Basilan, Bohol, Bongao [Sulus], Bubuan [Tapiantana & Tapul Groups, Sulus], Busuanga, Camiguin (Sur), Catanduanes, Cebu, Culion, Guimaras, Inampulugan, Jolo [Sulus], Leyte, Luzon, Mantique, Marinduque, Mindanao, Mindoro, Negros, Palawan, Panay, Papahag [Sulus], Polillo, Samar, Santa Cruz ([Sulus], Siargao, Sibuyan, Siquijor, Tablas, Tawitawi [Sulus], Masbate)  
Type locality: not given; Java (designated by Mertens 1930 fide MANTHEY & GROSSMANN 1997)
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Physical Description

Size

109.0-137.0 mm SVL

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Diagnostic Description

Coloration in life: Dorsal surfaces brown to olive brown, more or less uniform, or with black-edged scales which appear as narrow, black longitudinal lines; females and young tend to exhibit darker coloration of the lateral surfaces marked by greenish-white to white spots; males may have a large yellow to orange spot on neck and anterior lateral surface, especially during breeding season; venter light with a greenish to bluish tinge (Brown & Alcala, 1980)

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Look Alikes

Within the Philippines, Eutropis multifasciata is most similar to E. rudis. E multifasciata can be distinguished by it's larger size, larger number of mid-body scale rows, and smaller number of lamellae beneath the 4th toe.

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Ecology

Habitat

E. multifasciata is a common species throughout it's range that occurs in open areas of lowland and submontain forest, as well as secondary vegetation and highly disturbed habitats such as bamboo or coconut groves from near sea level to 1200 meters or more.

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General Ecology

Ecology

This species is active diurnally in open areas where it can be found basking, however it can also be found hiding under bark, piles of vegetation, and in tree holes.

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Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

This species if viviparous, with females giving birth to 2 to 10 offspring. Offspring SVL range from roughly 35-45 mm (Brown & Alcala, 1980).

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Eutropis multifasciata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 120
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data: Mabuya multifasciata

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


There are 12 barcode sequences available from BOLD and GenBank.  Below is a sequence of the barcode region Cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI or COX1) from a member of the species.  See the BOLD taxonomy browser for more complete information about this specimen and other sequences.

TATTTAATCTTCGGTGCCTGAGCAGGCATAGTCGGAACAGCCCTA---AGCCTATTAATCCGGGCTGAGCTCAATCAACCGGGGACTCTTTTAGGGGAC---GATCAGATCTATAATGTAATTGTTACAGCCCATGCTTTTGTCATAATTTTCTTCATGGTAATGCCTGTTATAATTGGAGGATTTGGCAATTGACTTGTCCCACTAATA---ATCGGAGCCCCTGACATGGCCTTCCCACGAATAAACAACATGAGCTTCTGACTTCTGCCACCCTCCTTCCTACTACTACTCGCCTCCTCCGGAGTTGAAGCCGGGGCCGGCACAGGCTGAACTGTATATCCCCCGCTTGCAGGAAACTTAGCCCACGCCGGGGCCTCAGTTGATTTA---ACCATTTTTTCACTACATCTGGCGGGGGTGTCCTCAATTTTAGGGGCAATCAACTTTATCACCACGTGCATCAACATAAAACCCCCTACTATAACCCAATACCAGACACCCCTTTTTGTCTGATCTGTGCTAATCACAGCCGTACTGCTATTACTCTCACTGCCCGTTCTGGCAGCA---GGGATTACAATGCTCCTCACAGACCGAAATCTAAACACATCCTTTTTCGACCCTGCCGGAGGAGGAGACCCGATTCTTTACCAGCACCTC
-- end --

Download FASTA File
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Mabuya multifasciata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 12
Specimens with Barcodes: 14
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

Due to it's broad geographic distribution and prevalence in disturbed habitats, according to the IUCN categories and classification structure, we consider the conservation status of this species as “Least Concern (LC)".

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Wikipedia

Eutropis multifasciata

The East Indian Brown Mabuya (Eutropis multifasciata), also known as Many-lined Sun Skink, Many-striped Skink, Common Sun Skink or (ambiguously) as "golden skink", is a species of skink.

Description[edit]

See Snake scales for terminology

Snout moderate,obtuse. Lower eyelid scaly. Nostril behind vertical of the suture between rostral and first labial; a postnasal; anterior loreal not deeper than the second, in contact with the first labial; supranasals frequently in contact behind rostral; frontonasal broader than long; prefrontals constantly forming a median suture; frontal as long as or shorter than the frontoparietals and interparietal together, in contact with the second (rarely also with the first) supraocular: 4 supraoculars, second largest; 6 supraciliaries, first largest; fronto-parietals distinct, larger than the interparietal, which entirely separates the parietals; a pair of nuchals, 4 labials anterior to the subocular, which is large and not narrower below. Ear-opening roundish or oval, as large as a lateral scale, or a little smaller, with or without a few very small lobules anteriorly. Dorsal scales more or less distinctly tri-(rarely quinque-) carinate: nuchals and laterals usually very feebly keeled, sometimes smooth; 30 to 34 scales round the middle of the body, subequal or dorsals largest. The hind limb reaches the wrist or the elbow of the adpressed fore limb. Subdigital lamellae smooth. Scales on upper surface of tibia mostly tricarinate. Tail 1.3 to 1.6 times length of head and body. Brown or olive above ; some specimens uniform, or with a large whitish (red) patch on each side; back frequently with small black spots, sometimes confluent into longitudinal lines; sides frequently dark brown, with whitish, black-edged ocelli; a well-defined light dorso-lateral band seldom present; lower surfaces yellowish or greenish white.[2]

Distribution[edit]

From India (Assam) to S China, China (Taiwan, Hainan, Yunnan) Thailand (incl. Phuket), Myanmar (= Burma), Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysian Peninsula, Pulau Tioman, Johor: Pulau Besar, Pulau Sibu, Singapore, Indonesia (Borneo, Sumatra, Java, Bali), New Guinea, The Philippines (Negros, Panay, Palawan: Calamian Islands, Luzon)

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  • Annandale,Nelson 1905 Contributions to Oriental Herpetology. Suppl. III. Notes on the Oriental lizards in the Indian Museum, with a list of the species recorded from British India and Ceylon. J. Asiat. Soc. Bengal (2) 1: 139-151
  • Gray, J. E. 1853 Descriptions of some undescribed species of reptiles collected by Dr. Joseph Hooker in the Khassia Mountains, East Bengal, and Sikkim Himalaya. Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. (2) 12: 386 - 392
  • Kuhl, H. 1820 Beiträge zur Kenntnis der Amphibien. In: KUHL, H.: Beiträge zur Zoologie und Vergleichenden Anatomie. Frankfurt a.M. (Hermannsche Buchhandlung): 75-132.
  • Mausfeld,P.; Vences, M. Schmitz, A. & Veith, M. 2000 First data on the molecular phylogeography of scincid lizards of the genus Mabuya. Mol. Phylogenet. Evol. 17 (1): 11-14
  • Mausfeld, Patrick & Andreas Schmitz 2003 Molecular phylogeography, intraspecific variation and speciation of the Asian scincid lizard genus Eutropis Fitzinger, 1843 (Squamata: Reptilia: Scincidae): taxonomic and biogeographic implications. Org. Divers. Evol. 3: 161-171
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