Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species occurs only in highly fragmented populations in western and central Portugal, occurring more contiguously in Aveiro in central Portugal. In western Portugal it occurs down to sea-level in many fragmented sites, while in central Portugal it occurs in hilly sites above 500m. In Spain it is known from two areas in on the northern slopes of the central mountain system at 500-1,200m. It also occurs at Coto Doñana in southwestern Spain at sea-level, and on the Berlenga Islands in Portugal (as a separate subspecies, P.c. berlengensis).
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Continent: Europe
Distribution: Spain (dunes of Coto Doñana, south of Andalusia, more than 400 km south of the Sistema Central range (Magraner, 1986); this was often refuted (Peréz-Mellado, 1997, 1998; Barbadillo et al., 1999); mountains to the Sistema Central and along the Atlantic lowlands (Sá-Sousa 1999, 2000).  berlengensis: Berlengas islands off the western coast of Portugal (Vicente, 1985);
Type locality: Berlenga Island, Portugal.  
Type locality: Laguna de San Marco, La Alberca, Prov. Salamanca, Spain.
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Source: The Reptile Database

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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
In Spain and central Portugal it occurs in oak forest. At sea-level it lives only in sand dunes. It lays one to three egg clutches a year, with one to five eggs in each.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
EN
Endangered

Red List Criteria
B1ab(i,ii,iii,iv,v)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2009

Assessor/s
Paulo Sá-Sousa, Valentin Pérez-Mellado, Iñigo Martínez-Solano

Reviewer/s
Cox, N. and Temple, H.J. (Global Reptile Assessment)

Contributor/s

Justification
Listed as Endangered, because its Extent of Occurrence is less than 5,000 km2, its distribution is severely fragmented, and there is continuing decline in its Extent of Occurrence, in its Area of Occupancy, in the extent and quality of its habitat, in the number of locations, and in the number of mature individuals.

History
  • 2006
    Endangered
    (IUCN 2006)
  • 2006
    Endangered
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Population

Population
It can be common in suitable habitat. The southern populations are generally very small, but can be abundant in tiny areas. However, many populations are probably in decline, especially in the south of its range.

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
The southern populations are almost certainly at risk from climate change. Loss of habitat due to touristic developments in the south, and wood plantations (pine) in central Portugal are also serious threats. Fires are an additional threat.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Many of the southern populations are protected (including in the Coto Doñana National Park). In central Portugal and Spain, some populations are in natural parks.
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Wikipedia

Podarcis carbonelli

The Carbonell's wall lizard (Podarcis carbonelli) is a species of lizard in the Lacertidae family. It is found in Portugal and Spain.

It reaches a length of 20 cm (7.9 in), and feeds primarily on small invertebrates like insects and arachnids, and also snails.[1] Its natural habitats are temperate forests and sandy shores. It is threatened by habitat loss.

References[edit]

Source[edit]

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