Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Description

Size: small to medium. Plumage: most grey above, barred below; rump feathers thick, long and stiff forming a pad; uppertail-coverts long and pointed, reach middle of tail; wings long and pointed with 8th primary longest; tail long, graduated. Other characters: hawk-like flight; bill moderately long, broad at the base with a wide gape; nostrils round and exposed; tarsus weak and feathered.
  • Fry, C.H., S. Keith & E.K. Urban (1988). The Birds of Africa, Volume III. Academic Press, London.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 55
Specimens with Sequences: 45
Specimens with Barcodes: 45
Species: 8
Species With Barcodes: 8
Public Records: 38
Public Species: 6
Public BINs: 6
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Cuculus

Cuculus is a genus of cuckoos which has representatives in most of the Old World, although the greatest diversity is in tropical southern and southeastern Asia. The species in taxonomic order are:

Some sources also include the pallid cuckoo in this genus, although there is disagreement about appropriate classification.[1]

The hawk-cuckoos are sometimes placed in a separate genus, Hierococcyx, while the pallid cuckoo may belong in Cacomantis.

These birds are of variable size with slender bodies, long tails and strong legs. Most occur in open forests, but some prefer more open country. Several species are migratory.

These are vocal species, with persistent and loud calls. They feed on large insects, with hairy caterpillars, which are distasteful to many birds, being a speciality. One or two species will also take some fruit.

Cuculus cuckoos are brood parasites, that is, they lay a single egg in the nests of various passerine hosts. The best-known example is the European common cuckoo. The female cuckoo in each case replaces one of the host’s eggs with one of her own. The cuckoo egg hatches earlier than the host’s, and the chick grows faster; in most cases the cuckoo chick evicts the eggs or young of the host species.

Cuculus species lay coloured eggs to match those of their passerine hosts. Female cuckoos specialise in a particular host species (generally the species that raised them) and lay eggs that closely resemble the eggs of that host.

A species may consist of several gentes, with each gens specialising in a particular host. There is some evidence that the gentes are genetically different from one another[citation needed] though other authorities state that as female cuckoos mate with males of any gens, genes flow between gentes.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Payne, RB (2005). The Cuckoos. Oxford University Press. 423. 
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