Overview

Brief Summary

Introduction

Introduction:

The superfamily Cimelioidea (formerly Axioidea) consists of the single family Cimeliidae (formerly Axiidae), which contains six species (Yen and Minet 2007) placed in two genera, Axia (five species) and Epicimelia (one species). Their distribution is circum-Mediterranean, including southern Europe, the Middle East and northern Africa. Monophyly for this family is supported by possession on the seventh abdominal segment of the adult of a unique pair of pocket-like organs, of unknown fuction, associated with the spiracles. The moths are medium-sized and generally bearing bright colors including gold, hence the common name 'gold moths.'  Axia margarita  Excellent images of live adult Axia margarita can be found at Moths and Butterflies of Europe and North Africa. The early stages of several species have been studied; all known larvae feed on Euphorbia (Euphorbiaceae).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

Leptree.net

Source: LepTree

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Evolution and Systematics

Evolution

Phylogenetic Relationships

Discussion of Phylogenetic Relationships:

The phylogenetic position of Cimeliidae has always been a puzzle (Yen and Minet 2007). Most recently (Minet 1991; Minet 1999; Beljaev 2009)these moths have been thought to belong to a large clade-the "Geometromorpha" of Fänger (1999)- consisting of Cimelioidea, Calliduloidea, Geometroidea, Drepanoidea and the butterflies sensu lato (Hedyloidea + Hesperioidea + Papilionoidea). Strong evidence against this hypothesis, however, has emerged from recent molecular studies (Regier, Zwick et al. 2009; Cho, Zwick et al., submitted). In the molecular trees, the "Geometromorpha" are never monophyletic; indeed, the butterflies never group with other Macrolepidoptera. The placement of Cimeliidae is unstable and never strongly supported; the two commonly-observed possibilities are as sister group to Mimallonidae, or to Doidae. Thus, the phylogenetic position of Cimeliidae remains mysterious.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

Leptree.net

Source: LepTree

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:9Public Records:4
Specimens with Sequences:9Public Species:2
Specimens with Barcodes:6Public BINs:1
Species:3         
Species With Barcodes:2         
          
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Cimeliidae

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Cimeliidae

Cimeliidae or the "Gold moths" (formerly known as Axiidae[1]) is a family of moths whose precise relationships within the Macrolepidoptera are currently uncertain, but they currently represent the only family in a recently recognized superfamily whose nearest relatives include the butterflies, Calliduloidea, Drepanoidea, Geometroidea, Bombycoidea, Mimallonoidea and Lasiocampoidea, and the Noctuoidea. Uniquely, they have a pair of pocket-like organs on the seventh abdominal spiracle of the adult moth[2] which are only possibly sound receptive organs.[3] They are quite large and brightly coloured moths that occur only in Southern Europe and feed on species of Euphorbia. Sometimes they are attracted to light.[2]

Further reading[edit]

  • J. J. De Freina & T. J. Witt (1987). Die Bombyces und Sphinges der Westpalearktis. ISBN 3-926285-00-1. 
  • Christopher O'Toole, ed. (2002). Firefly Encyclopedia of Insects and Spiders. ISBN 1-55297-612-2. 
  • Ahmet Ömer Koçak (1983). "Additions and corrections to the names published in "Systematic and synonymic list of the Lepidoptera of France, Belgium and Corsica" by Leraut, 1980". Priamus (Ankara) 2: 137–157. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shen-Horn Yen & Joël Minet (2007). "Cimelioidea: a new superfamily name for the gold moths (Lepidoptera: Glossata)" (PDF). Zoological Studies 46 (3): 262–271. 
  2. ^ a b J. Minet (1999). "The Axioidea and Calliduloidea". In N. P. Kristensen. Lepidoptera, Moths and Butterflies. Volume 1: Evolution, Systematics, and Biogeography. Handbuch der Zoologie. Eine Naturgeschichte der Stämme des Tierreiches. Walter de Gruyter, Berlin & New York. pp. 257–261. 
  3. ^ J. Minet & A. Surlykke (2003). "Auditory and sound producing organs". In N. P. Kristensen. Lepidoptera, moths and butterflies. Volume 2: Morphology and Physiology. Handbuch der Zoologie. Eine Naturgeschichte der Stämme des Tierreiches. Walter de Gruyter, Berlin. pp. 289–323. 
  • Yen, S.-H.; Minet, J. 2007: Cimelioidea: a new superfamily name for the gold moths (Lepidoptera: Glossata). Zoological studies, 46(3): 262-271. [1]
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!