Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 1166
Specimens with Sequences: 1129
Specimens with Barcodes: 913
Species: 82
Species With Barcodes: 77
Public Records: 634
Public Species: 45
Public BINs: 73
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Wikipedia

Asiatic salamander

The Asiatic salamanders (family Hynobiidae) are primitive salamanders found all over Asia, and in European Russia. They are closely related to the giant salamanders (family Cryptobranchidae), with which they form the suborder Cryptobranchoidea. About half of hynobiids are unique to Japan.[1]

Hynobiid salamanders practice external fertilization, or spawning. And, unlike other salamander families which reproduce internally, male hynobiids focus on egg sacs rather than females during breeding.[2] The female lays two egg sacs at a time, each containing up to 70 eggs. Parental care is common.[3]

A few species have very reduced lungs, or no lungs at all. The tadpoles can sometimes have reduced external gills if they live in cold and very oxygen-rich water.

Phylogeny[edit]

Cladograms based on the work of Pyron and Wiens (2011)[4] and modified using Mikko Haaramo [5]



?†Iridotriton hechti



?†Liaoxitriton



?Protohynobius puxiongensis



Onychodactylus





Pachyhynobius shangchengensis



Salamandrella



Hynobiinae

Hynobius





Ranodon sibiricus



Paradactylodon





Batrachuperus




Liua



Pseudohynobius








Classification[edit]

Currently, 54 species are known. These genera make up the Hynobiidae:

Subfamily Hynobiinae

References[edit]

  1. ^ (Hasumi 2002).
  2. ^ (Hasumi, 2002).
  3. ^ Lanza, B., Vanni., S., & Nistri, A. (1998). Cogger, H.G. & Zweifel, R.G., ed. Encyclopedia of Reptiles and Amphibians. San Diego: Academic Press. p. 69. ISBN 0-12-178560-2. 
  4. ^ Pyron, R.A.; Weins, J.J. (2011). "A large-scale phylogeny of Amphibia including over 2800 species, and a revised classification of advanced frogs, salamanders, and caecilians". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 61: 543–853. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2011.06.012. 
  5. ^ Haaramo, Mikko (2011). "Caudata – salamanders". Mikko's Phylogeny Archive. 

Hasumi, M. (2002). About hynobiids. Retrieved May 8, 2005 from [1].

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