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Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This species has a wide distribution and is endemic to China, occurring in the provinces of Hong Kong, Taiwan, Beijing, Shandong, Henan, Shaanxi, Gansu, Liaoning, Jilin, Fujian, Anhui, Jiangsu, Zhejiang, Jiangxi, Guangdong, Guangxi, Hunan, Hubei, Guizhou, Yunnan, Sichuan (Smith and Xie 2008), and Hebei (CSIS 2008).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
This species has been recorded roosting in old temples and under roof tiles, and also include caves, buildings (roof, cellar), ruins, hollow trees, and rock crevices. It forages in the surrounding forest habitat.

In early-mid November, it begins hibernation (Smith and Xie 2008). Ovulation for this species occurs at the end of March through the beginning of April, with delayed fertilization that often produces twins in late June (Smith and Xie 2008). Gestation time is 50-60 days (Smith and Xie 2008).

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Smith, A.T. & Johnston, C.H.

Reviewer/s
Jones, G. & Rossiter, S. (Chiroptera Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, occurrence in a number of protected areas, and because it is unlikely to be declining at nearly the rate required to qualify for listing in a threatened category.
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Population

Population
This species appears to be common over much of China (Jones, G. pers. comm.).

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no major threats to this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This species is present in Tiantangzhai, Wuyishan, Dinghushan (Guangdong), Shimenhupingshan, Taibaishan, Foping, Gaoligongshan (Yunnan), Qingliangfeng, Tianmushan, Wawushan, and Zhujiashan Nature Reserves (CSIS 2008). In China, this species has been regionally Red Listed as Least Concern (Wang and Xie 2004).
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Wikipedia

Chinese noctule

The Chinese noctule (Nyctalus plancyi) is a common and widespread species of bat belonging to the Vespertilionidae family.

Distribution and habitat[edit]

The Chinese noctule is endemic to China and occurs in most of its provinces, such as Hong Kong and Taiwan.[1] They typically inhabit forests, but also commonly appear within rural communities. The bats are often found roosting under buildings, hollow trees, ruins, caves, and rock cervices.[1][2]

Description[edit]

The Chinese noctule are distinguished by their golden brown fur. The length of their forearm averages to about 48.7 mm to 52.5 mm and the bat weighs around 21 to 26 grams.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Smith, A.T. & Johnston, C.H. (2008). "Nyctalus plancyi". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2011.1. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 12 July 2011. 
  2. ^ a b "Nyctalus plancyi". University of Bristol. Retrieved 12 July 2011. 
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