Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Mazama bororo is known from the southeastern part of the state of São Paulo to the northeastern part of the state of Paraná, Brazil.
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
Mazama bororo lives in small fragments of the remaining Atlantic Forest.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
VU
Vulnerable

Red List Criteria
C2a(ii)

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2008

Assessor/s
Duarte, J.M.B

Reviewer/s
Black, P. & Gonzalez, S. (Deer Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
This species is considered to be Vulnerable due to a small population size and ongoing decline inferred from hunting and habitat loss, and where 100% of the individuals are in a single subpopulation. Duarte et al. (2005), estimated the total population size of this species as 5,500 individuals (mature individuals being a fraction of this number), limited for the Coastal Atlantic Forest in Brazil. This area is threatened by human occupation (70% of the Brazilian population lives inside the original limits of the Atlantic Forest), poaching and dog predation. Though small, the distribution area of M. bororo has more than 3,600 km² of officially protected areas and many of them are connected between each other, forming one of the biggest blocks of Atlantic Forest in Brazil (i.e. one subpopulation).

History
  • 2000
    Data Deficient
  • 2000
    Data Deficient
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Population

Population
This taxon has been proposed as a new species (Duarte and Giannoni 1996), but has not yet been formally described with vouchered material. The current size and distribution of the population is not known., as it was only discovered in 1992 (Duarte and Giannoni 1996). A population is known to exist in an isolated patch of Atlantic rain forest near the city of Capao Bonito in the state of São Paulo. The maximum population size for species is 4,500 individuals (Duarte et al. 2006).

Population Trend
Decreasing
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Threats

Major Threats
The main threat to the population is thought to be habitat fragmentation as Atlantic rainforest is being broken into isolated patches in the region (Duarte and Giannoni 1996).
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
Based on the current destruction of this environment, it has been suggested that today M. bororo is the most threatened deer species in Brazil. It will be necessary to join forces to protect and conserve it (Duarte and Jorge, 2003). Wemmer (1998) recommended a scientific description of the species to establish its biological reality.
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Wikipedia

Small red brocket

The Small Red Brocket (Mazama bororo) is a small species of deer in the Cervidae family.[2] It is endemic to Atlantic Forest in Paraná and São Paulo in southeastern Brazil. This species, which only was scientifically described in 1996, is threatened by habitat loss.[1] Though its size and structure most resemble that of the Pygmy Brocket (M. nana), its coloration is very similar to that of the Red Brocket (M. americana).[3] It resembles hybrids between these two species even more closely, but differs from both, and their hybrids, in karyotype.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Duarte, J.M.B (2008). Mazama bororo. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 10 April 2009. Database entry includes a brief justification of why this species is of vulnerable.
  2. ^ Grubb, P. (2005). "Order Artiodactyla". In Wilson, D. E.; Reeder, D. M. Mammal Species of the World (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 637–722. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494. 
  3. ^ Vogliotti, A., and J. M. B. Duarte (2009). Discovery of the first wild population of the small red brocket deer Mazama bororo (Artiodactyla: Cervidae). Mastozool. Beotrop. 16(2).
  4. ^ Duarte, J. M. B., and W. Jorge. (2003). Morphologic and cytogenetic description of the small red brocket (Mazama bororo Duarte, 1996) in Brazil. Mammalia 67: 403-410.


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