Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:1,141Public Records:361
Specimens with Sequences:702Public Species:163
Specimens with Barcodes:640Public BINs:166
Species:239         
Species With Barcodes:205         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Xanthidae

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Genomic DNA is available from 1 specimen with morphological vouchers housed at Museum of Tropical Queensland
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Genomic DNA is available from 3 specimens with morphological vouchers housed at Florida Museum of Natural History
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Genomic DNA is available from 5 specimens with morphological vouchers housed at Florida Museum of Natural History
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Wikipedia

Xanthidae

Xanthidae is a family of crabs known as mud crabs, pebble crabs or rubble crabs.[1] Xanthid crabs are often brightly coloured and are poisonous, containing toxins which are not destroyed by cooking and for which no antidote is known.[2] The toxins are similar to the tetrodotoxin and saxitoxin produced by puffer fish, and may be produced by bacteria in the genus Vibrio living in symbiosis with the crabs, mostly V. alginolyticus and V. parahaemolyticus.[2]

Classification[edit]

Many species formerly included in the family Xanthidae have since been moved to new families. Despite this, Xanthidae is still the largest crab family in terms of species richness, with 572 species in 133 genera divided among the thirteen subfamilies:[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Xanthidae". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. 
  2. ^ a b Ria Tan (2008). "Xanthid crabs: Family Xanthidae". Wild Singapore. Retrieved January 11, 2010. 
  3. ^ Sammy De Grave, N. Dean Pentcheff, Shane T. Ahyong et al. (2009). "A classification of living and fossil genera of decapod crustaceans" (PDF). Raffles Bulletin of Zoology. Suppl. 21: 1–109. 
  4. ^ Jose Christopher E. Mendoza & Danièle Guinot (2011). "Revision of the genus Glyptoxanthus A. Milne-Edwards, 1879, and establishment of Glyptoxanthinae nov. subfam. (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura: Xanthidae)" (PDF excerpt). Zootaxa 3015: 29–51. 
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