Overview

Distribution

Range Description

Known only from off the Rowley Shoals, Western Australia.
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Australia: Western Australia.
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Eastern Indian Ocean: off NW Australia.
  • Last, P.R., W.T. White and J.D. Stevens 2007 New species of Squalus of the 'highfin megalops group' from the Australasian region. p. 39-53. In P.R. Last, W.T. White and J.J. Pogonoski Descriptions of new dogfishes of the genus Squalus (Squaloidea:Squalidae). CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research Paper No. 014. 130 p. (Ref. 58440)
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Physical Description

Size

Max. size

58.9 cm TL (male/unsexed; (Ref. 58440))
  • Last, P.R., W.T. White and J.D. Stevens 2007 New species of Squalus of the 'highfin megalops group' from the Australasian region. p. 39-53. In P.R. Last, W.T. White and J.J. Pogonoski Descriptions of new dogfishes of the genus Squalus (Squaloidea:Squalidae). CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research Paper No. 014. 130 p. (Ref. 58440)
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Diagnostic Description

This species of the 'highfin megalops group' is distinguished by the following set of characters: abdomen depth 9.0-10.6% TL; pre-vent length 48.6-49.2% TL, about 2.5 times dorsal caudal margin; pre-second dorsal length 4.3-4.4 times pectoral-fin anterior margin, about 3.1 times dorsal caudal margin; head width about 1.5 times abdomen width; preoral length 2.9-3.2 times horizontal prenarial length, about 8.7% TL; head length 4.4-4.7 times eye length; mouth width 3.1-3.3 times length of upper labial furrow; interorbital width about 1.5 times horizontal preorbital length; fifth gill slit height 2.2-2.5% TL; strongly bifurcated anterior nasal flap; first dorsal fin upright, upper posterior margin directed posteroventrally, greatest concavity slightly closer to free rear tip than fin apex; posterior margin of second dorsal fin deeply concave; second dorsal-fin spine with a broad base; pectoral fin not falcate, anterior margin short, 13.9-14.1% TL; dorsal surface slightly darker than ventral surface, but tones not sharply demarcated on side of head; dorsal fins pale with paler tips; first dorsal-fin spine darker than base of soft portion of dorsal fin; caudal fin has a broad white posterior margin, caudal bar absent; flank denticles are weakly to moderately tricuspid; monospondylous centra 42-44, precaudal centra 88-92, total centra 114-120 (Ref. 58440).
  • Last, P.R., W.T. White and J.D. Stevens 2007 New species of Squalus of the 'highfin megalops group' from the Australasian region. p. 39-53. In P.R. Last, W.T. White and J.J. Pogonoski Descriptions of new dogfishes of the genus Squalus (Squaloidea:Squalidae). CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research Paper No. 014. 130 p. (Ref. 58440)
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
The biology of this dogfish is essentially unknown. It occurs at depths of ~300 m. Known only from two type specimens.

Systems
  • Marine
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Environment

pelagic-oceanic; marine; depth range 298 - 305 m (Ref. 58440)
  • Last, P.R., W.T. White and J.D. Stevens 2007 New species of Squalus of the 'highfin megalops group' from the Australasian region. p. 39-53. In P.R. Last, W.T. White and J.J. Pogonoski Descriptions of new dogfishes of the genus Squalus (Squaloidea:Squalidae). CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research Paper No. 014. 130 p. (Ref. 58440)
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
DD
Data Deficient

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2009

Assessor/s
White, W., Cavanagh, R.D. & Lisney, T.J.

Reviewer/s
Valenti, S.V., Gibson, C.G. & Fowler, S.L. (Shark Red List Authority)

Contributor/s

Justification
The Western Highfin Spurdog (Squalus altipinnis) is a deepwater dogfish, only known from two specimens. This species is only known from a very restricted area on the continental slope of Western Australia near Rowley Shoals in ~300 m of water. This area is subject to the North West Slope Trawl and Western Deepwater Trawl fisheries. Like other deepwater dogfishes, this species is likely to have the limiting life history characteristics making it inherently vulnerable to population depletion. Although there has been no assessment of the effect on the non-target bycatch species of these fisheries, fishing effort is small with only a few boats in operation. The lack of data on the species biology, extent of occurrence, population size, or any indicator of population trend warrants a Data Deficient assessment at this time.
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Population

Population
Known only off the continental slope of Western Australia near Rowley Shoals at depths of ~300 m. There is currently no information on population or subpopulation size.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
Possibly caught as bycatch of the North West Slope Trawl and Western Deepwater Trawl fisheries, but these fisheries are small with only a few boats in operation, and although details on bycatch are currently unavailable, given the low fishing effort, it is unlikely the impact is cause for concern for this species at the present time.

Like other deepwater squaloid sharks, this species is likely to have the limiting life history characteristics and may not be sufficiently fecund to withstand high levels of exploitation.
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Data deficient (DD)
  • IUCN 2006 2006 IUCN red list of threatened species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded July 2006.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
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Wikipedia

Western highfin spurdog

The western highfin spurdog, Squalus altipinnis, is a dogfish of the family Squalidae. It is found on the continental shelf off Western Australia, at depths of between 220 and 510 m. Its reproduction is ovoviviparous.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ W. White, R. D. Cavanagh & T. J. Lisney (2008). "Squalus altipinnis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2009.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved March 3, 2010. 
  2. ^ Compagno, Dando, & Fowler, Sharks of the World, Princeton University Press, New Jersey 2005 ISBN 0-691-12072-2
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