Overview

Brief Summary

Introduction

The family Parastacidae contains all freshwater crayfish found naturally occurring in the southern hemisphere. Although widespread, with representatives occurring in South America, Madagascar (Fig. 2), and New Zealand, the family achieves by far its greatest diversity within Australia (Fig. 1). Over 85% of the known species of parastacid crayfish are from Australia. Similarly, nine of the 14 genera presently recognized within the Parastacidae are restricted to the Australian continent and nearby islands (including southern New Guinea) (Hobbs, 1988; Hobbs, 1991). The Australian freshwater crayfish fauna is unique and highly diverse, both in terms of species richness and in ecological and morphological diversity. This fauna contains the largest known freshwater invertebrate (Astacopsis gouldi [Clark]) and the highly evolved "land crayfishes" (e.g. Engaeus) which are able to complete their entire life cycle independent of surface water. In terms of the number of species, morphological variability, and ecological diversity, Australia's freshwater crayfish fauna is rivalled only by that found in the south east of the USA (for examples of Australian crayfish diversity, see Merrick, 1993).

Figure 1. Distribution of the 10 Australian Parastacid genera (from Hobbs 1988).

Figure 2. Distributions of the remaining Parastacid genera. Note that there is an overlap of Parastacus and Samastacus in central Chile that is not depicted very well in the graphic.

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Evolution and Systematics

Evolution

Discussion of Phylogenetic Relationships

View Parastacidae Tree

Riek (1972)  

Studies of phylogenetic relationships among genera of parastacid crayfish to date have been of limited scope (Riek, 1969; Riek, 1972; Patak & Baldwin, 1984; Patak et al., 1989; Austin, 1995; Crandall et al. 1995) and have produced conflicting results using a variety of approaches and data sets. Riek (1969) presented the first systematic hypothesis for the relationships among the Australian genera (presented here). This hypothesis was based on features of the male genitalia, cephalothorax, and chelae as well as body shape (Riek, 1969). Subsequent to this study, Riek (1972) proposed an alternative interpretation with the additional characters associated with the cephalothoracic grooves and orientation of the chelae. This latter hypothesis added the genera Gramastacus and Paranephrops to the phylogeny and shifted the association of Parastacoides from the Euastacus-Astacopsis clade to the Cherax clade.
The two major clades proposed by Riek (1972) form two ecologically distinct groups; Engaeus, Engaewa, and Tenuibranchiurus form the first group, representing strong burrowers in which the fingers of the chelae move in a vertical plane; Euastacus, Astacopsis, Gramastacus, Geocharax, Parastacoides, Paranephrops, and Cherax comprise the second group of moderate burrowers in which the fingers of the chelae move largely or completely in a horizontal plane.

Patak and Baldwin (1984) applied electrophoretic and immunochemical comparisons of haemocyanins to infer phylogenetic relationships among a subset of the Australian genera. These biochemical techniques generated a hypothesis that differed from that of Riek (1972) in that the Geocharax-Gramastacus clade was clustered with the genus Engaeus instead of within Riek's ecological group two. Patak et al. (1989) later added two additional genera to their study (Parastacoides and Paranephrops) resulting in a phylogeny that differed in the placement of Cherax and Euastacus. Using a goodness of fit test in association with the immunochemical data, Patak et al. (1989) rejected their previous tree as well as the hypothesis of Riek (1972), concluding these were incompatible with their new data set.

Austin (1995) proposed a sister relationship between Cherax and Geocharax based on allozyme data (24 enzymatic loci) and morphological data (55 characters, including most traits previously emphasized by Riek [1969, 1972] and Hobbs [1989]). Treating the morphological data and allozyme data as independent data sets, Austin (1995) obtained support for the clustering of Cherax with Geocharax in both cases. Finally, Crandall et al. (1995) reconstructed phylogenetic relationships for representatives of various Australian genera using nucleotide sequence data from the 16S mitochondrial genome. The resulting tree was statistically incompatible with the hypotheses proposed by Riek and the Patak and Baldwin hypothesis. However, the results were compatible with the Patak et al. (1989) and the Austin (1995) hypotheses. For a summary of these alternative hypotheses see Crandall et al. (1995). Because none of these studies have included all the genera found in Australia (not to mention in the family Parastacidae) the tree shown is Riek's (1969) with the additional southern hemisphere genera included with relationships suggested by Hobbs (1988;1991).

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 456
Specimens with Sequences: 452
Specimens with Barcodes: 383
Species: 101
Species With Barcodes: 100
Public Records: 426
Public Species: 98
Public BINs: 134
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Parastacidae

Parastacidae is the family of freshwater crayfish found in the southern hemisphere. The family is a classic Gondwana-distributed taxon, with extant members in South America, Madagascar, Australia, New Zealand and New Guinea, and extinct taxa also in Antarctica.

Distribution[edit]

The natural range of the family Parastacidae [2]

Three genera are found in Chile, Virilastacus, Samastacus and Parastacus, the last of which also occurs disjunctly in southern Brazil and Uruguay.

There are no crayfish native to continental Africa, but seven species on Madagascar, all of the genus Astacoides.[3]

Australasia is particularly rich in crayfish. The small genus Paranephrops is endemic to New Zealand. Two genera, Astacopsis and Parastacoides are endemic to Tasmania, while a further two are found on either side of the Bass StraitGeocharax and Engaeus. The greatest diversity, however, is found on the Australian mainland. Three genera are endemic and have restricted distributions (Engaewa, Gramastacus and Tenuibranchiurus), while two are more widespread and contain nearly ninety species between them: Euastacus, around the Australian coast from Melbourne to Brisbane, and Cherax across Australia and New Guinea.

Fossil record[edit]

The oldest specimens from the family Parastacidae are the Albian fossils of Palaeoechinastacus from Victoria, Australia.[4] The only northern hemisphere representative is also a fossil, Aenigmastacus crandalli from Canada.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ T. H. Huxley (1879). The Crayfish: an Introduction to the Study of Zoology. London: C. Kegan Paul & Co. 
  2. ^ J. W. Fetzner, Jr (2005). "The crayfish and lobster taxonomy browser: a global taxonomic resource for freshwater crayfish and their closest relatives". Retrieved 27 March 2006. 
  3. ^ Christopher B. Boyko, Olga Ramilijaona Ravoahangimalala, Désiré Randriamasimanana & Tony Harilala Razafindrazaka. "Astacoides hobbsi, a new crayfish (Crustacea: Decapoda: Parastacidae) from Madagascar". Zootaxa 1091: 41–51. 
  4. ^ Anthony J. Martin, Thomas H. Rich, Gary C. B. Poore, Mark B. Schultz, Christopher M. Austin, Lesley Kool & Patricia Vickers-Rich (2008). "Fossil evidence in Australia for oldest known freshwater crayfish of Gondwana" (PDF). Gondwana Research 14 (3): 287–296. doi:10.1016/j.gr.2008.01.002. 
  5. ^ Rodney A. Feldmann, Carrie E. Schweitzer & John Leahy (2011). "New Eocene crayfish from the McAbee Beds in British Columbia: First record of Parastacoidea in the Northern Hemisphere". Journal of Crustacean Biology 31 (2): 320–331. doi:10.1651/10-3399.1. 
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