Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

M 54 mm, F 55-64 mm. Tibiotarsal articulation reaches the eye. Hand without webbing, foot webbing 1(1), 2i(1), 2e(0.5), 3i(1.5), 3e(1), 4i(2.5), 4e (2), 5(1). Terminal discs of fingers and toes strongly enlarged. Dorsal skin smooth. Colour dorsally brown with more or less distinct olive or light brown patches and markings. Venter whitish with brown pigment on the limbs and throat. Males as far as known probably have no nuptial pads but also lack femoral glands (Glaw and Vences 2007).

Similar species: Due to its large size and unique habitat this species is unlikely to be mistaken with any other Malagasy frog (Glaw and Vences 2007).

Taken with permission from Glaw and Vences (2007).

  • Glaw, F., and Vences, M. (2007). Field Guide to the Amphibians and Reptiles of Madagascar. Third Edition. Vences and Glaw Verlag, Köln.
  • Vences, M. and Andreone, F. (2008). Tsingymantis antitra. In: IUCN 2008. 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded on 22 April 2009.
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Distribution

Distribution and Habitat

Found in Ankarana (Glaw and Vences 2007). It occurs from 50-117 m asl in eroded "tsingy" limestone formations (Vences and Andreone 2008).

  • Glaw, F., and Vences, M. (2007). Field Guide to the Amphibians and Reptiles of Madagascar. Third Edition. Vences and Glaw Verlag, Köln.
  • Vences, M. and Andreone, F. (2008). Tsingymantis antitra. In: IUCN 2008. 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded on 22 April 2009.
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Conservation

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Habits: Almost all specimens found so far were adult females, observed in the rainy season (January-March) active during the night on karstic limestone rocks or on the ground, often close to brooks or caves. Dissected females contained only small oocytes, indicating they were not in breeding condition (Glaw and Vences 2007).

Calls: Unknown (Glaw and Vences 2007).

  • Glaw, F., and Vences, M. (2007). Field Guide to the Amphibians and Reptiles of Madagascar. Third Edition. Vences and Glaw Verlag, Köln.
  • Vences, M. and Andreone, F. (2008). Tsingymantis antitra. In: IUCN 2008. 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded on 22 April 2009.
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Threats

Life History, Abundance, Activity, and Special Behaviors

Appears to be rare, as it is known from only four specimens plus one field observation. It occurs in one protected area, the Ankarana Special Reserve. Further research is needed to determine the extent of its distribution, and its ecological needs (Vences and Andreone 2008).

  • Glaw, F., and Vences, M. (2007). Field Guide to the Amphibians and Reptiles of Madagascar. Third Edition. Vences and Glaw Verlag, Köln.
  • Vences, M. and Andreone, F. (2008). Tsingymantis antitra. In: IUCN 2008. 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded on 22 April 2009.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© AmphibiaWeb © 2000-2015 The Regents of the University of California

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