Overview

Distribution

Range Description

This recently described species is considered to be endemic to Madagascar (Monterio 2006), in an area in the south of the island, which represents a high endemicity (E. Monnier pers. comm. October 2011). There is little information in the literature on this species' range. Bouchet et al. (in press) found the first live specimen (Bouchet et al. in press Atimo vatae expedition). The species was previously known from dead specimens only (G. Raybaudi pers. comm. October 2011).
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Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
There are no data available in the literature on the habitat of this species. A recent expedition found the first live specimen at 100 m depth; the species has also been found from dredging at 80-90 m (Bouchet et al. in press).

The maximum size for shells of this species is 84 mm (G. Raybaudi and S. Veldsman pers. comm. October 2011).

Systems
  • Marine
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Conservation

Conservation Status

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2013

Assessor/s
Veldsman, S.G.

Reviewer/s
Peters, H. & Raybaudi-Massilia, G.

Contributor/s

Justification
This recently described species is considered to be endemic to Madagascar, in an area in the south of the island. Although this species is range-restricted, it is a deep water species which is unlikely to be affected by any threats. It has in the past been collected by dredging, but it is unlikely that this is carried out at an intensity which would affect the species. Although the species is not very well known and has only recently been collected live for the first time, the lack of perceived threats justifies a Least Concern listing.
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Population

Population
There are no population data available for this species in the literature.

Population Trend
Unknown
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Threats

Major Threats
Although the species is restricted in range and very little is known, it is unlikely to be affected by any threats. Pollution is not considered a major threat on the southern coast of Madagascar (E. Monnier pers. comm. October 2011), particularly not to this deep water species. Dredging is also not carried out at an intensity which is thought to affect the species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions

There are few data on which to base an assessment for this species. To overcome this further research would be appropriate into its abundance, distribution, habitats. The species has only recently been live collected for the first time (Bouchet et al. in press).

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Wikipedia

Conus medoci

Conus medoci is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Conidae, the cone snails and their allies.[2]

Like all species within the genus Conus, these snails are predatory and venomous. They are capable of "stinging" humans, therefore live ones should be handled carefully or not at all.

Contents

Description

Distribution

References

  1. ^ Lorenz. 2004. Visaya 1(2) : 19-23. World Register of Marine Species, Retrieved 27 March 2010.
  2. ^ Conus medoci Lorenz, 2004.  Retrieved through: World Register of Marine Species on 27 March 2010.
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