Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Annual, biennial or perennial herbs. Leaves lyrate-pinnatifid, ± glaucous. Flowers white, yellow, lilac or purplish, in terminal, ebracteate racemes. Sepals erect. Petals 4, unguiculate. Stamens 6. Fruit cylindric or beaded, indehiscent or breaking up transversely into 1-seeded joints; apex with a seedless beak. Seeds pitted.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Distribution

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Raphanus L.:
Brazil (South America)
Honduras (Mesoamerica)
United States (North America)
Colombia (South America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / parasite
colony of Albugo candida parasitises live, discoloured, distorted leaf of Raphanus
Remarks: season: spring, early autumn

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / spot causer
colony of Alternaria dematiaceous anamorph of Alternaria brassicae causes spots on live pod of Raphanus

Foodplant / open feeder
gregarious larva of Athalia glabricollis grazes on leaf (underside) of Raphanus
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / gall
larva of Ceutorhynchus pleurostigma causes gall of stem (base) of Raphanus

Foodplant / spot causer
colony of Pseudocercosporella anamorph of Mycosphaerella capsellae causes spots on live leaf of Raphanus

Foodplant / open feeder
adult of Phaedon cochleariae grazes on live leaf of Raphanus
Remarks: season: 5-9

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Known predators

Raphanus (Raphanus (wild radish)) is prey of:
Lygus
Lepidoptera
Melanoplus
Hyadaphis
Myzus
Phyllotreta chalbeipennis
Macrosteles

Based on studies in:
USA: New Jersey (Agricultural)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • D. J. Shure, Radionuclide tracer analysis of trophic relationships in an old-field ecosystem, Ecol. Monogr. 43(1):1-19, from p. 15 (1973).
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:80Public Records:55
Specimens with Sequences:68Public Species:8
Specimens with Barcodes:65Public BINs:0
Species:10         
Species With Barcodes:10         
          
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Raphanus

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Raphanus

Raphanus is a genus within the flowering plant family Brassicaceae. Two or three species are currently classified in Raphanus.[citation needed] They include the cultivated radish, Raphanus sativus and the common wild radish or jointed charlock, Raphanus raphanistrum. Some authors accept the podding or rattail radish, Raphanus caudatus as a third member of the genus, while others treat it as a variety of R. sativus. Substantial numbers of other species in the genus have been proposed at various times, but almost all are currently regarded as varieties of R. sativus, while a few are treated as varieties of R. raphanistrum or are not accepted as well-described species.[clarification needed] Examples are R. raphanistrum ssp. landra and R. raphanistrum ssp. maritimus (sea radish).

Raphanus species grow as annual or biennial plants, with a taproot which is much enlarged in the cultivated radish. Unlike many other genera in the family Brassicaceae, Raphanus has indehiscent fruit that do not split open at maturity to reveal the seeds.

The genus is native to Asia, but its members can now be found world wide. Growing wild, they are regarded as invasive species in many regions.

Raphanus species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species, including cabbage moth, Endoclita excrescens, the garden carpet and the nutmeg.

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Source: Wikipedia

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