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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Annual or biennial herbs. Basal leaves entire or pinnatifid; cauline amplexicaul. Inflorescence an elongated raceme. Flowers (in ours) white. Sepals not saccate. Petals 4. Stamens 6. Silicula flattened, triangular-obcordate with keeled net-veined valves. Seeds several in each loculus.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 1 specimen in 1 taxon.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 10 - 10
 
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:83
Specimens with Sequences:105
Specimens with Barcodes:90
Species:5
Species With Barcodes:5
Public Records:58
Public Species:5
Public BINs:0
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Capsella (plant)

Not to be confused with Capsella (bivalve).

Capsella is a genus of herbaceous plant and biennial plants in the Mustard family Brassicaceae.[1] It is a close relative of Arabidopsis, Neslia, and Halimolobos.[2]

Some recent authors circumscribe Capsella to contain only three species: Capsella bursa-pastoris, Capsella rubella and Capsella grandiflora.[2]

Capsella rubella is a self-fertilizing species that became self-compatible 50,000 to 100,000 years ago. Its outcrossing progenitor was Capsella grandiflora. In general, the shift from outcrossing to self-fertilization is among the most common transitions in flowering plants. Capsella rubella is studied as a model for understanding the evolution of self-fertilization.[3][4]

Species[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "19. Capsella Medikus". Flora of China. 
  2. ^ a b Slotte, T.; Ceplitis, A.; Neuffer, B.; Hurka, H.; Lascoux, M. (2006). "Intrageneric phylogeny of Capsella (Brassicaceae) and the origin of the tetraploid C. Bursa-pastoris based on chloroplast and nuclear DNA sequences". American Journal of Botany 93 (11): 1714–1724. doi:10.3732/ajb.93.11.1714. 
  3. ^ Brandvain Y, Slotte T, Hazzouri KM, Wright SI, Coop G (2013). "Genomic identification of founding haplotypes reveals the history of the selfing species Capsella rubella". PLoS Genet. 9 (9): e1003754. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1003754. PMC 3772084. PMID 24068948. 
  4. ^ Slotte T, Hazzouri KM, Ågren JA, Koenig D, Maumus F, Guo YL, Steige K, Platts AE, Escobar JS, Newman LK, Wang W, Mandáková T, Vello E, Smith LM, Henz SR, Steffen J, Takuno S, Brandvain Y, Coop G, Andolfatto P, Hu TT, Blanchette M, Clark RM, Quesneville H, Nordborg M, Gaut BS, Lysak MA, Jenkins J, Grimwood J, Chapman J, Prochnik S, Shu S, Rokhsar D, Schmutz J, Weigel D, Wright SI (July 2013). "The Capsella rubella genome and the genomic consequences of rapid mating system evolution". Nat. Genet. 45 (7): 831–5. doi:10.1038/ng.2669. PMID 23749190. 
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Source: Wikipedia

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Capsella (bivalve)

Capsella is a mollusc genus in the family Donacidae, the bean clams or wedge shells.

References

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