Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Glycyrrhiza macedonica

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data: Glycyrrhiza echinata

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Glycyrrhiza macedonica

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Glycyrrhiza echinata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Glycyrrhiza echinata

Glycyrrhiza echinata is a species of flowering plant in the genus Glycyrrhiza.

Distribution[edit]

Glycyrrhiza echinata is native to south-eastern Europe, adjacent parts of West Asia and East Asia.[2]

Taxonomy[edit]

Glycyrrhiza echinata was one of the species described by Carl Linnaeus in his 1753 work Species Plantarum, the starting point for botanical nomenclature. It has many common names, including Roman licorice,[2] Eastern European licorice[3] and Hungarian licorice.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Glycyrrhiza echinata L.". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved November 8, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Johannes Seidemann (2005). "Glycyrrhiza L. – licorice, liquorice, sweetwood – Fabaceae (Leguminosae)". World Spice Plants: Economic Usage, Botany, Taxonomy. Springer. pp. 169–170. ISBN 9783540222798. 
  3. ^ Zoë Gardner & Michael McGuffin (2013). "Glycyrrhiza spp.". American Herbal Products Association’s Botanical Safety Handbook (2nd ed.). CRC Press. pp. 417–422. ISBN 9781466516946. 
  4. ^ Debra Rayburn (2007). "Licorice". Let's Get Natural with Herbs. Ozark Mountain Publishing. pp. 265–266. ISBN 9781886940956. 


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