Overview

Comprehensive Description

Miscellaneous Details

Notes: On gravelly hill slopes & grasslands
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Brief

Flowering class: Dicot Habit: Herb Distribution notes: Exotic
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

Annual herb, to 60 cm, glandular-hairy. Leaves: petiole to 4 cm, without a gland; leaves with 2 pairs of opposite leaflets with a gland on the rhachis between each pair. Inflorescences terminal. Petals 5-6 mm, yellow, orange, salmon or pinkish-red with reddish-brown veins. Stamens 5, subequal; filaments straight. Pod 3-6 cm, flat.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Range Description

Chamaecrista absus has a very large geographical distribution, that includes North and South America, tropical Africa, southern Asia and Australasia.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

"
Global Distribution

Sri Lanka, Peninsular India and Himalayas

Indian distribution

State - Kerala, District/s: All Districts

"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Maharashtra: Common throughout
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Found in scrub jungles and disturbed grounds from plains to 1000m. Common. Old world tropics.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Worldwide distribution

Widespread in the Old Wordl tropics.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution: W. Pakistan (N.W.F. Province, Punjab); everywhere in tropics of the world.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

"
Flower

In terminal or leaf-opposed racemes; reddish to flame coloured. Flowering from November-February.

Fruit

A short, stipitate pod, ligulate, falcate, flat, strigose; seeds 6, ovoid, longitudinal. Fruiting December onwards.

Field tips

Leaflets in 2 pairs, digitate. Rachis with subsessile glands between leaflets.

Leaf Arrangement

Alternate distichous

Leaf Type

Paripinnate

Leaf Shape

Ovate-obovate

Leaf Apex

Obtuse-rotund

Leaf Base

Cuneate

Leaf Margin

Entire

"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Annual, Herbs, Taproot present, Nodules present, Stems erect or ascending, Stems less than 1 m tall, Plants gland-dotted or with gland-tipped hairs, Stems solid, Stems or young twigs sparsely to densely hairy, Stem hairs hispid to villous, Leaves alternate, Leaves petiolate, Extrafloral nectary glands on petiole, Stipules conspicuous, Stipules setiform, subulate or acicular, Stipules persistent, Stipules free, Leaves compound, Leaves even pinnate, Leaf or leaflet margins entire, Leaflets opposite, Leaflets 4, Leaves viscid, sticky, Leaves glabrous or nearly so, Flowers in axillary clusters or few-floweredracemes, 2-6 flowers, Inflorescences racemes, Inflorescence axillary, Bracts very small, absent or caducous, Bracteoles present, Flowers actinomorphic or somewhat irregular, Calyx 5-lobed, Calyx hairy, Petals separate, Petals clawed, Petals orange or yellow, Petals bicolored or with red, purple or yellow streaks or spots, Fertile stamens 5, Fertile stamens 2-3, Stamens heteromorphic, gra ded in size, Stamens completely free, separate, Filaments hairy, villous, Anthers opening by basal or terminal pores or slits, Style terete, Reduced cleistogamous flowers produced, Fruit a legume, Fruit unilocular, Fruit freely dehiscent, Fruit elongate, straight, Fruit oblong or ellipsoidal, Fruit exserted from calyx, Fruit internally septate between the seeds, Fruit compressed between seeds, Fruit explosively or elastically dehiscent, Valves twisting or coiling after dehiscence, Fruit glabrous or glabrate, Fruit hairy, Fruit 3-10 seeded, Seeds subquadrate, Seed surface smooth, Seeds olive, brown, or black.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

Dr. David Bogler

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Description

A herb or undershrub, 10-60 cm tall, erect, widely branching, clothed with viscous glandular hairs. Stipules 4 mm long, linear, persistent, viscous hairy, petiole 1.9-4 cm long, rachis 5-13 mm long. Leaflets in two pairs, broadly elliptic to obovate, unequal sided, 2-2.8 (-3.5) cm long and 10-18 (-25) mm broad, very puberulous or pubescent on both the surfaces, top rounded to blunt, base rounded or cuneate, petiolules 1 mm long, gland present between the pairs, .5 mm long, ligulate-acute, viscid-hairy. Racemes terminal or leaf opposed, c. 4-12 cm long, ± sessile. Bracts ovate, c. 2 mm long, viscous hairy. Bracteole 1, about the middle of each pedicel, c. 1 mm long, viscid hairy. Pedicel c. 3-4 mm long, rough hairy. Calyx 5, 4 mm long, viscous hairy, imbricate. Petals broadly obovate, 5-7 mm long, claw 1-3 mm long, glabrous. Stamens 5, fertile, staminodes absent. Disc straight, with 1-2 mm long bristles. Ovary densely strigose, sessile, c. 7-ovulate, style gla¬brous, 2 mm long, stigma shell-shaped, incurved. Pods flat, coarsely hairy, thin valved, dehiscent, strap shaped, 4 cm long, 8 mm wide, short beaked; stipe 5 mm long. Seeds 4-8, black, glossy, subovate.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

"Viscid herbs, puberulus. Leaves 4 cm; leaflets inequalateral, 2-3 x 1.5 to 2 cm, obovate- elliptic, base cuneate, pubescent, glands sessile on the rachis between leaflets; stipule 2-3 mm. Racemes terminal or leaf-opposed, to 6 cm; peduncle to 2 cm; pedicel 0.5 cm; bracts 2-2.5 mm, ovate; sepals 4 mm, oblong, apex acute; petals 5, 6 mm, obovate; stamens 5, 3 longer, dilated. Pod 3.5 x 0.6 cm, falcate, glandular pubescent."
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic

"Habit: A medium sized subshrub, upto 75cm."
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Diagnostic

Habit: Herb
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
C. absus is found in grasslands, grassy hills, pastures, savannas with Bryrsonima and Curatella, also in openings in tropical deciduous forest and pine-oak forest.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

General Habitat

"Degraded forest areas, also in the plains"
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Population Biology

Frequency

Common
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering and fruiting: September-December
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
Groom, A.

Reviewer/s
Hilton-Taylor, C.

Contributor/s

Justification
Chamaecrista absus is a common species with an extremely widespread distribution. The taxon is is known to occur within the protected areas network and is not known to be experiencing any major threatening processes at present. C. absus is thus rated as Least Concern.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Population

Population
This taxon is common and widespread.

Population Trend
Stable
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Major Threats
This taxon is not considered to be specifically theatened or in decline at present.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
This taxonis known to occur within protected areas across its native range and seeds have been collected by the Millennium Seed Bank Project as a method of ex situ conservation.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources

Source: IUCN

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Uses

Medicinal
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© India Biodiversity Portal

Source: India Biodiversity Portal

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Notes

Comments

Chaksine, extracted from this plant, is reputed to have an action on central and peripheral nervous system. Seeds are astringent and strengthen the sight when used as collyrium. Powdered seeds are used in ophthalmia and conjunctivitis. It is also used as cathartic, and in cases of skin infection.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!