Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Distribution: Pakistan; Kashmir, Central Asia; Caucasia, Siberia, throughout Europe.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Perennial, scrambling or suberect. Rootstock creeping, stem sparsely pubescent. Leaf paripinnately compound, leaflets 8-12, 1-3 cm long, c. 5-12 mm broad, narrowly ovate, subobtuse or emarginate; stipules semi-sagittate toothed, the upper entire, tendril branched. Inflorescence a 2-5-flowered raceme, peduncle short. Calyx c. 7-9 mm long, glabrous or pubescent, mouth somewhat oblique, teeth unequal, the lowest subequal to the tube. Corolla reddish to lilac blue. Vexillum c. 12-15 mm long. Fruit 20-25 mm long, 7 mm broad, narrowly oblong, glabrous, 4-7-seeded.
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Physical Description

Perennial, Herbs, Plants with rhizomes or suckers, Nodules present, Stems erect or ascending, Stems or branches arching, spreading or decumbent, Stems less than 1 m tall, Climbing by tendrils, Stems solid, Stems or young twigs sparsely to densely hairy, Stems hairs pilose or spreading, Leaves alternate, Leaves petiolate, Stipules conspicuous, Stipules green, triangulate to lanceolate or foliaceous, Stipules persistent, Stipules free, Stipules cordate, lobed, or sagittate, Leaves compound, Leaves even pinnate, Leaf or leaflet margins entire, Leaflets opposite, Leaflets alternate or subopposite, Leaflets 5-9, Leaflets 10-many, Leaves hairy on one or both surfaces, Flowers in axillary clusters or few-floweredracemes, 2-6 flowers, Inflorescence sessile or subsessile, Inflorescence axillary, Bracts very small, absent or caducous, Flowers sessile or nearly so, Flowers zygomorphic, Calyx 5-lobed, Calyx hairy, Petals separate, Corolla papilionaceous, Petals clawed, Petals white, Petals blue, lavander to purple, or violet, Petals bicolored or with red, purple or yellow streaks or spots, Banner petal ovoid or obovate, Wing petals narrow, oblanceolate to oblong, Wing petals auriculate, Wing tips obtuse or rounded, Keel tips obtuse or rounded, not beaked, Stamens 9-10, Stamens diadelphous, 9 united, 1 free, Filaments glabrous, Style terete, Style sharply bent, Style hairy, Style hairy on one side only, Style with distal tuft of hairs, Fruit a legume, Fruit stipitate, Fruit unilocular, Fruit freely dehiscent, Fruit oblong or ellipsoidal, Fruit exserted from calyx, Valves twisting or coiling after dehiscence, Fruit glabrous or glabrate, Fruit 3-10 seeded, Seeds ovoid to rounded in outline, Seed surface smooth, Seeds olive, brown, or black, Seed surface mottled or patchy.
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Dr. David Bogler

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / miner
solitary larva of Agromyza felleri mines leaf of Vicia sepium
Other: sole host/prey

Foodplant / gall
larva of Apion aethiops causes gall of stem of Vicia sepium
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / internal feeder
larva of Apion pomonae feeds within pod (on unripe seeds) of Vicia sepium
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / internal feeder
larva of Apion punctigerum feeds within pod of Vicia sepium
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / feeds on
larva of Apion vorax feeds on Vicia sepium
Other: major host/prey

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / parasite
Erysiphe pisi var. pisi parasitises Vicia sepium

Foodplant / gall
Megoura viciae causes gall of leaf of Vicia sepium

Foodplant / parasite
hypophyllous sporangium of Peronospora viciae parasitises yellowed leaflet of Vicia sepium
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / feeds on
larva of Sitona ambiguus feeds on Vicia sepium
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / feeds on
larva of Sitona suturalis feeds on Vicia sepium
Other: major host/prey

Foodplant / parasite
telium of Uromyces viciae-fabae var. viciae-fabae parasitises live Vicia sepium

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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flower/Fruit

Fl.Per.: July-August.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Vicia sepium

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Vicia sepium

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 7
Specimens with Barcodes: 12
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Vicia sepium

Vicia sepium1.jpg

Vicia sepium or bush vetch is a plant species of the genus Vicia. A nitrogen-fixing, perennial, leguminous climbing plant that grows in hedgerows, grasslands, the edges of woodland, roadsides and rough ground. Occurs in western Europe, Russia including Siberia, Crimea, Caucasus and Central Asia. Also eastern Canada, north-eastern states of the USA and, where suitable habitat occurs, in Greenland. Found throughout England and eastern parts of Wales.

Description[edit]

A rhizomatous plant. Its climbing habit is enabled by branched tendrils at the end of each leaf stem, which curl around surrounding plants. The stems are not branched, are almost glabrous, sometimes with rare soft hairs, single, mostly 30 to 40 cm long but sometimes as much as 100 cm. The leaves are compound and pinnate with 4 to 8 pairs of opposite leaflets ending in branched tendrils.[1] Leaflets are 20 to 30 mm long, 8 to 10 mm wide, elongated elliptical in form with broad bases and glabrous at both sides. Flower stalks are very short with 2 to 6 almost sessile flowers on each. Flowers are 12 to 15 mm long,[2] reddish-lilac or lilac-blue. Similar in appearance to common vetch (Vicia sativa) but each stem of the latter has more flowers, and bush vetch is usually hairless whereas V. sativa is slightly hairy.

Flowers between May to August, occasionally into November. Mainly cross pollinated by insects. The resultant pods or legumes ripen mainly during July to August, are 30 to 40 mm long, 6 to 8 mm wide, elongated, rhomboid and black in colour. The seeds within are black or brown.

A good potential forage crop with high nutritional value, characterized by high seed productivity in less favourable years. Can by used for hay or silage, particularly arable silage, from perennial grass-vetch mixtures.

Bush vetch supports a variety of generalist legume feeders including beetles, weevils and caterpillars. Bumblebees and honeybees seek out the flowers for their nectar.

Ecology[edit]

Hedges and grasses thickets. [3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Webb, D.A., Parnell, J. and Doogue, D. 1996. An Irish Flora. Dundalgan Press Ltd. Dundalk. ISBN 0-85221-131-7
  2. ^ Clapham, A.R., Tutin, T.G. and Warburg, E.F. 1968. Excursion flora of the British Isles. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0 521 04656 4
  3. ^ Martin, K. 1965. The Concise British Flora in Colour. Designed and produced by George Rainbird Ltd


http://www.devonwildlifetrust.org/species/Bush+vetch/


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