Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:1,626Public Records:1,447
Specimens with Sequences:1,572Public Species:505
Specimens with Barcodes:1,511Public BINs:0
Species:546         
Species With Barcodes:516         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Inocybaceae

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Wikipedia

Inocybaceae

The Inocybaceae are a family of fungi in the order Agaricales. According to a 2008 estimate, the family contains 13 genera and 821 species.[1] Members of this family have a widespread distribution in tropical and temperate areas.[2]

Taxonomy[edit]

The type genus of the Inocybaceae, Inocybe, had traditionally been placed within the Cortinariaceae family.[3][4] Despite this, Jülich placed the genus in its own family, the Inocybaceae.[5] Later, the Cortinariaceae were shown to be polyphyletic.[6][7] Additionally, phylogenetic analyses of RPB1, RPB2 and nLSU-rDNA regions from a variety of Inocybe and related taxa would support Jülich's recognition of Inocybe at the family level.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kirk PM, Cannon PF, Minter DW, Stalpers JA. (2008). Dictionary of the Fungi (10th ed.). Wallingford, UK: CAB International. p. 340. ISBN 978-0-85199-826-8. 
  2. ^ Cannon PF, Kirk PM. (2007). Fungal Families of the World. Wallingford, UK: CABI. p. 176. ISBN 0-85199-827-5. 
  3. ^ Singer, Rolf (1986). The Agaricales in Modern Taxonomy. Koenigstein, Germany: Koeltz Scientific Books. ISBN 3-87429-254-1. 
  4. ^ Bisby, Guy Richard; Ainsworth, G. C.; Kirk, P. M.; Aptroot, André (2001). Ainsworth & Bisby's Dictionary of the Fungi / by P. M. Kirk... [et al.]; with the assistance of A. Aptroot... [et al.] Oxon, UK: CAB International. p. 255. ISBN 0-85199-377-X. 
  5. ^ Jülich W. (1982). Higher taxa of Basidiomycetes. Bibliotheca Mycologia 85. Cramer, Vaduz. 485 pp.
  6. ^ Moncalvo JM, Lutzoni FM, Rehner SA, Johnson J, Vilgalys R (2000). "Phylogenetic relationships of agaric fungi based on nuclear large subunit ribosomal DNA sequences". Syst. Biol. 49 (2): 278–305. doi:10.1093/sysbio/49.2.278. PMID 12118409. 
  7. ^ Moncalvo JM, Vilgalys R, Redhead SA, Johnson JE, James TY, Catherine Aime M, Hofstetter V, Verduin SJ, Larsson E, Baroni TJ, Greg Thorn R, Jacobsson S, Clémençon H, Miller OK. (2002). "One hundred and seventeen clades of euagarics". Mol. Phylogenet. Evol. 23 (3): 357–400. doi:10.1016/S1055-7903(02)00027-1. PMID 12099793. 
  8. ^ Matheny PB (2005). "Improving phylogenetic inference of mushrooms with RPB1 and RPB2 nucleotide sequences (Inocybe; Agaricales)". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 35 (1): 1–20. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2004.11.014. PMID 15737578. 
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