The following bibliography has been generated by bringing together all references provided by our content partners. There may be duplication.

References

  • A.S. Adams, C.R. Currie, Y. Cardoza, K.D. Klepzig, and K.F. Raffa. (2009) Effects of symbiotic bacteria and tree chemistry on the growth and reproduction of bark beetle fungal symbionts. Can. J. For. Res. 39: 1133–1147
  • Canadian Journal of Forest Research 35: 274–284
  • Christiansen, E., Solheim,H. (2007) The bark beetle-associated blue-stain fungus Ophiostoma polonicum can kill various spruces and Douglas fir. Journal of Forest Pathology. 20(6-7), 436-446
  • Jae-Jin Kim, Eric A. Allen, Leland M. Humble, and Colette Breuil. (2005) Ophiostomatoid and basidiomycetous fungi associated with green, red, and grey lodgepole pines after mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) infestation
  • Journal Papers
  • Kirk P.M. (2013). Species Fungorum (version 9.0, Sep 2010). In: Species 2000 & ITIS Catalogue of Life, 11th March 2013 (Roskov Y., Kunze T., Paglinawan L., Orrell T., Nicolson D., Culham A., Bailly N., Kirk P., Bourgoin T., Baillargeon G., Hernandez F., De Wever A., eds). Digital resource at www.catalogueoflife.org/col/. Species 2000: Reading, UK.
  • Lee, S., Kim, J.-J., and Breuil, C. 2006. Diversity of fungi associated with the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, and infested lodgepole pines in British Columbia. Fungal Di-vers. 22: 91–105.
  • Owen, D.R.; Linuaiil, K.Q. Jr.; Woodd L.; Parme’l’lill, J.R.Jr.,(1987) Pathogenicity of fungi isolated from Dendroetonus valens, D. brcvicomis, and D. ponderosae to ponderosa pine seedlings. Phytopathology 77, 631-636
  • Rice A.V., Thormann M.N., and Langor D.W. (2007) Virulence of, and interactions among, mountain pine beetle associated blue-stain fungi on two pine species and their hybrids in Alberta. Canadian Journal of Botany 85: 316–323
  • Rice A.V., Thormann M.N., and Langor D.W. (2008) Mountain pine beetle-associated blue-stain fungi are differentially adapted to boreal temperatures. Forest Pathology 38: 113-123
  • Robinson-Jeffrey, R.C.; Davidson, R.W.(1968) Three new Europhium species with Verticicladiella imperfect states on blue-stained pine. Canadian Journal of Botany 46(12): 1523
  • Six, D.L., and Paine, T.D. 1998. Effects of mycangial fungi and host tree species on progeny survival and emergence of Den- droctonus ponderosae (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). Environ. Ento- mol. 27: 1393–1401.
  • Six, D.L.; Harrington, T.C.; Steimel, J.; McNew, D.; Paine, T.D. (2003) Rust fungi causing galls, witches’ brooms, and other abnormal plant growths in northwestern Argentina. Mycologia 95(5): 791
  • Websites
  • Y. Yamaoka, Y. Hiratsuka and P. J. Maruyama. (1995) The ability of Ophiostoma clavigerum to kill mature lodgepole-pine trees. European Journal of Forest Pathology 25: 401-404
  • Y. Yamaoka; R. H. Swanson; Y. Hiratsuka. (1990)Inoculation of lodgepole pine with four blue-stain fungi associated with mountain pine beetle, monitored by a heat pulse velocity (HPV) instrument. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 20 pp 31-36
  • Zipfel, R.D.; Beer, W. de; Jacobs, K.; Wingfield, B.D.; Wingfield, M.J. (2006) Multi-gene phylogenies define Ceratocystiopsis and Grosmannia distinct from Ophiostoma. Studies in Mycology 55: 90
  • Zipfel, R.D.; Beer, W. de; Jacobs, K.; Wingfield, B.D.; Wingfield, M.J., 2006, Studies in Mycology 55: 90
  • Zipfel, R.D.; Beer, Z.W. de; Jacobs, K.; Wingfield, B.D.; Wingfield, M.J. 2006. Multigene phylogenies define Ceratocystiopsis and Grosmannia distinct from Ophiostoma. In: Stud. Mycol. 55:75–97
  • http://www.coloradoforestproducts.org/bluewood.htm

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