Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Diagnosis

Hydroid colony stolonal or sparingly branched; hydrotheca delicate, tubular, elongated, radially symmetrical, operculum a continuation of hydrothecal wall, composed of several long, triangular flaps, not delimited by crease-line; in older colonies operculum generally lost and hydrotheca reduced to a perisarcal collar; hydranth with intertentacular web, tentacles amphicoronate, moniliform-like when completely extended; gonotheca large, pedicellate, cylindrical, giving rise to one or two medusae. Medusa with wide, circular manubrium; usually no gastric peduncle; numerous simple or branched radial canals; gonads on radial canals, separated from manubrium; marginal tentacles hollow; usually with excretory pores or papillae on bulbs; no marginal or lateral cirri; statocysts closed; no ocelli.
  • Pallas, P. A. 1766. Elenchus zoophytorum sistens generum adumbrationes generaliores et specierum cognitarium succinctas descriptiones cum selectis auctorum synonymis. Fransiscum Varrentrapp, Hagae. pp. 451.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:93Public Records:33
Specimens with Sequences:33Public Species:3
Specimens with Barcodes:33Public BINs:7
Species:6         
Species With Barcodes:3         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Aequoreidae

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Wikipedia

Aequoreidae

Aequoreidae is a hydrozoan family. There are approximately 30 known species found in temperate and tropical marine coastal environments.[2] Aequoreids include Aequorea victoria, the organism from which the green fluorescent protein gene was isolated.[3]

Contents

Polyps

Only the polyp stages of Aequorea species have been observed.[4] The colonies are covered with chitinous periderm and can be either prostrate or erect with weak or sympodial branching.[4] Young hydranths possess hydrothecae with a closing structure called operculum.,[4] which consists of several relatively long triangular folds that meet together in the centre when a disturbed polyp contracts.[4] Because the operculum is quite fragile, hydrothecae of old polyps usually have only a small chininous collar remaining.[4] Comparatively large cylindrical gonothecae are attached to the colony with a thin peduncle.[4] Commonly only one medusa develops in each gonotheca.[4]

Medusae

Mature aequoreid medusae are diverse in shape, from lens-like to conical, and in size.[2] The smallest, Aequerea parva is only 0.6 cm in diameter, while the largest, Rhacostoma atlanticum, can reach 40 cm in diameter.[2][4] The medusae of most species are between 5 and 15 cm in diameter.[2]

Genera

Aequoreidae includes the following genera:[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Peter Schuchert (2011). "Aequoreidae". In P. Schuchert. World Hydrozoa database. World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved January 20, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d Kramp, P. L. (1961). Synopsis of the medusae of the world. Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 40: 1–469. P. 203–212. The full text
  3. ^ Tsien, R. (1998). The green fluorescent protein. Annual Review of Biochemistry 67: 509–44. The full text. doi:10.1146/annurev.biochem.67.1.509.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Bouillon, J., Gravili, C., Pagès, F., Gili, J. M., Boero, F. (2006). An introduction to Hydrozoa. Mémoires du Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle 194: 1–591, p. 276–278.
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