Overview

Brief Summary

Hyalomma ticks are important vectors of the virus causing Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever. Ticks in this genus parasitize domestic and wild mammals and birds and are abundant in semi-arid zones. Most Hyalomma species have 3-host life cycles, but some species undergo either a 2-host or 3-host cycle depending on the host; ticks of at least one species (H. scupense) have a 1-host life cycle. Unlike most other ixodid ticks, which wait on vegetation for a host to pass, adult Hyalomma actively run out from their resting sites when a host approaches. (Jongejan and Uilenberg 2004)

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:157Public Records:101
Specimens with Sequences:138Public Species:6
Specimens with Barcodes:136Public BINs:10
Species:11         
Species With Barcodes:11         
          
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Barcode data

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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Hyalomma

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Wikipedia

Hyalomma

Hyalomma is a genus of hard-bodied ticks, common in Asia, Europe, and North Africa. They are also found in Southern Africa. The bites cause the surrounding tissue to die and become necrotic. The dead tissue falls out of the body after a few days. The wounds look very serious, but usually heal without any intervention and do not generally become infected any further.

This species is credited with spreading the virus that causes the life-threatening Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.

Species[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gharbi, M.; Darghouth, M.A. (2014). "A review of Hyalomma scupense (Acari, Ixodidae) in the Maghreb region: from biology to control.". Parasite 21: 2. doi:10.1051/parasite/2014002. PMID 24507485. 
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