Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Tropical America to sw U.S. and Florida.

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Range Description

Crotalaria pumila occurs in tropical America to southwest United States.
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Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

Annual, Perennial, Shrubs, Herbs, Taproot present, Nodules present, Stems erect or ascending, Stems or branches arching, spreading or decumbent, Stems less than 1 m tall, Stems solid, Stems or young twigs glabrous or sparsely glabrate, Stems or young twigs sparsely to densely hairy, Leaves alternate, Leaves petiolate, Stipules inconspicuous, absent, or caducous, Stipules deciduous, Stipules free, Leaves compound, Leaves palmately 2-3 foliate, Leaves odd pinnate, Leaf or leaflet margins entire, Leaflets 3, Leaves hairy on one or both surfaces, Inflorescences racemes, Inflorescence axillary, Inflorescence terminal, Inflorescence leaf-opposed, Bracts very small, absent or caducous, Bracteoles present, Flowers zygomorphic, Calyx 5-lobed, Calyx hairy, Petals separate, Corolla papilionaceous, Petals orange or yellow, Petals bicolored or with re d, purple or yellow streaks or spots, Banner petal suborbicular, broadly rounded, Wing petals narrow, oblanceolate to oblong, Keel abruptly curved, or spirally coiled, Stamens 9-10, Stamens or anthers dimorphic, alternating large and small, Stamens monadelphous, united below, Filaments glabrous, Style terete, Style hairy, Fruit a legume, Fruit stipitate, Fruit unilocular, Fruit freely dehiscent, Fruit elongate, straight, Fruit oblong or ellipsoidal, Fruit exserted from calyx, Fruit inflated or turgid, Fruit hairy, Fruit 11-many seeded, Seeds ovoid to rounded in outline, Seed surface smooth, Seeds olive, brown, or black.
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Dr. David Bogler

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Type Information

Isotype for Crotalaria chiapensis Brandegee
Catalog Number: US 1206917
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): C. A. Purpus
Locality: Near Buena Vista., Chiapas, Mexico, North America
  • Isotype: Brandegee, T. S. 1924. Univ. Calif. Publ. Bot. 10: 406.
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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Pinelands, hammocks, adjacent to beaches or mangroves, disturbed and ruderal waste areas (Isely, 1990).

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Habitat and Ecology

Habitat and Ecology
C. pumila is a erect, ascending or rarely decumbent annual which grows in sandy, gravelly or clay soils in scrub pineland, coastal strand, sand dune with low, shrubby vegetation and also in disturbed habitat, such us along roadsides.

C. pumila is a herbaceous species with wide environmental tolerance and potential for ecological restoration and agroforestry systems. For that reason the species has probably been introduced in some countries, where it has then turned out to be an invasive weed, this might also be due to the capacity of spreading easily through seed dispersal (each pod contains 20+ seeds). The seeds are toxic to livestock.

Systems
  • Terrestrial
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Crotalaria pumila

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Crotalaria pumila

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 10
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Widespread and common.

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IUCN Red List Assessment


Red List Category
LC
Least Concern

Red List Criteria

Version
3.1

Year Assessed
2012

Assessor/s
Contu, S.

Reviewer/s
Hilton-Taylor, C.

Contributor/s

Justification
Crotalaria pumila is a widespread and common species for which there are no known threats at present, hence the species is rated as Least Concern.
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Population

Population
The species is described as the commonest Crotalaria in the Sonoran Desert (Shreve and Wiggings 1964).

Population Trend
Stable
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Threats

Major Threats
There are no major known threats to this species.
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Management

Conservation Actions

Conservation Actions
There are no known conservation measures specifically for C. pumila, but the species is currently known to occur in some protected areas, such as Everglades National Park, Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Samples of seed of C. pumila are stored in the Svalbard Global Seed Vault.
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