Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Range: Clark county, Nevada. East and north slopes of the Spring Mountains. One population on the west side of Charleston Mountain. Morefield (2001) noted the maximum range dimension as 17mi.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

Perennial, Herbs, Stems woody below, or from woody crown or caudex, Plants with rhizomes or suckers, Nodules present, Stems erect or ascending, Stems less than 1 m tall, Stems solid, Stems or young twigs sparsely to densely hairy, Leaves alternate, Leaves petiolate, S tipules conspicuous, Stipules membranous or chartaceous, Stipules persistent, Stipules free, Leaves compound, Leaves odd pinnate, Leaf or leaflet margins entire, Leaflets opposite, Leaflets 5-9, Leaflets 10-many, Leaves hairy on one or both surfaces, Flowers in axillary clusters or few-floweredracemes, 2-6 flowers, Inflorescences racemes, Inflorescence axillary, Bracts very small, absent or caducous, Flowers zygomorphic, Calyx 5-lobed, Calyx glabrous, Petals separate, Corolla papilionaceous, Petals clawed, Petals blue, lavander to purple, or violet, Banner petal narrow or oblanceolate, Wing petals narrow, oblanceolate to oblong, Wing tips obtuse or rounded, Keel petals auriculate, spurred, or gibbous, Keel tips obtuse or rounded, not beaked, Stamens 9-10, Stamens diadelphous, 9 united, 1 free, Filaments glabrous, Style terete, Style persistent in fruit, Fruit a legume, Fruit stipitate, Fruit unilocular, Fruit freely dehiscent, Fruit oblong or ellipsoidal, Fruit orbicular to subglobose, Fruit or valves persistent on stem, Fruit exserted from calyx, Fruit inflated or turgid, Fruit beaked, Fruit hairy, Fruit 11-many seeded, Seeds cordiform, mit-shaped, notched at one end, Seed surface smooth, Seeds olive, brown, or black.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

Dr. David Bogler

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Type Information

Isotype for Astragalus aequalis Clokey
Catalog Number: US 1828580
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Card file verified by examination of alleged type specimen
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): I. W. Clokey
Year Collected: 1937
Locality: Charleston Mountains, Harris Springs road., Clark, Nevada, United States, North America
Elevation (m): 2200 to 2200
  • Isotype: Clokey, I. W. 1942. Madrono. 6: 215.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Calcareous gravelly flats, hillsides, and open ridges at 1800-2560 m elevation. Often sheltering under sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) or gambel oak (Quercus gambelii). Other common associates include Utah juniper (Juniperus osteosperma) and curl-leaf mountain mahogany (Cercocarpus ledifolius var. intermontanus).

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 6 - 80

Comments: 23 known element occurrences.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G2 - Imperiled

Reasons: There are currently 23 known occurrences, all in Clark County, Nevada. Restricted to limestone bedrock habitats in the Spring Mountains. This species has disappeared from previously known sites that now have heavy recreation use. Extant occurrences are also threatened by increased development and recreational use of the area. Additional threats are mountain home development and 'rural sprawl', mega-fires, climate change, non-native species, road construction and maintenance, and wild horse and burro trampling.

Environmental Specificity: Moderate. Generalist or community with some key requirements scarce.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Global Short Term Trend: Relatively stable to decline of 30%

Comments: This species has disappeared from previously known sites that now have heavy recreation use. Also, 4% of the cited locations in the 'Adaptive Management Report for the Clark County, Nevada, Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan' (Sada et al. 2008) are expected to be directly impacted by the permit allowing conversion of wildnerness to development.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Threats

Degree of Threat: High

Comments: An 'Adaptive Management Report for Clark County, Nevada, Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (MSHCP)' was written in 2008 for all of Clark County, Nevada in response to an Incidental Take Permit held by Clark County, Nevada Department of Transportation and several cities. The Incidental Take Permit allows up to 145,000 acres of habita loss to take place over 30 years beginning in January 2001 (Sada et al. 2008). Astragalus aequalis is endemic to Clark County, Nevada, Spring Mountains and is considered in the MSHCP. It is estimated that approximately 4% of the considered sites of A. aequalis in the Plan will be lost due to direct human impacts from the Permit (Sada et al. 2008). Sada et al. 2008 note the following major threats to the communities in which A. aequalis is found: incidence of mega-fires, non-native species, development, recreation, and climate change.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!