Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Lupinus tidestromii Greene:
United States (North America)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Global Range: Monterey, Marin, and Sonoma Counties (Skinner 1997).

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Historic Range:
U.S.A. (CA)

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Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

Perennial, Shrubs, Herbs, Stems woody below, or from woody crown or caudex, Taproot present, Nodules present, Stems or branches arching, spreading or decumbent, Stems prostrate, trailing, or mat forming, Stems less than 1 m tall, Stems solid, Stems or young twigs sparsely to densely hairy, Stems hairs pilose or spreading, Stems silvery, canescent, tomentose, cobwebby, or wooly, Leaves alternate, Leaves petiolate, Stipules conspicuous, Stipules setiform, subulate or acicular, Stipules persistent, Stipules adnate to petiole, Leaves compound, Leaves palmately 2-3 foliate, Leaves palmately 5-11 foliate, Leaf or leaflet margins entire, Leaflets 3, Lea flets 5-9, Leaves hairy on one or both surfaces, Inflorescences racemes, Inflorescence terminal, Bracts conspicuously present, Bracts very small, absent or caducous, Bracteoles present, Flowers zygomorphic, Calyx 5-lobed, Calyx 2-lipped or 2-lobed, Calyx hairy, Petals separate, Corolla papilionaceous, Petals clawed, Petals pinkish to rose, Petals blue, lavander to purple, or violet, Petals bicolored or with red, purple or yellow streaks or spots, Banner petal ovoid or obovate, Wing petals narrow, oblanceolate to oblong, Wing tips obtuse or rounded, Keel petals auriculate, spurred, or gibbous, Stamens 9-10, Stamens or anthers dimorphic, alternating large and small, Stamens monadelphous, united below, Filaments glabrous, Style terete, Fruit a legume, Fruit unilocular, Fruit freely dehiscent, Fruit elongate, straight, Fruit oblong or ellipsoidal, Fruit exserted from calyx, Fruit internally septate between the seeds, Fruit hairy, Fruit 3-10 seeded, Seeds ovoid to rounded in out line, Seed surface smooth, Seeds olive, brown, or black, Seed surface mottled or patchy.
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Dr. David Bogler

Source: USDA NRCS PLANTS Database

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Ecology

Habitat

Comments: Occurs on partially stabilized coastal dunes up to about 8 m high in the mild maritime climate of the central California coast and grows in coastal dune communities in association with Menzies' wallflower, sand gilia, beach sagewort, sand verbena, and mock heather (Fish and Wildlife Service 1997).

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Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: 6 - 20

Comments: Known from nineteen extant populations (Fish and Wildlife Service 1997).

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Conservation

Conservation Status

Current Listing Status Summary

Status: Endangered
Date Listed: 06/22/1992
Lead Region:   California/Nevada Region (Region 8) 
Where Listed:


Population detail:

Listing status: E

For most current information and documents related to the conservation status and management of Lupinus tidestromii, see its USFWS Species Profile

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National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N2 - Imperiled

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G2 - Imperiled

Reasons: Endemic to California, Lupinus tidestromii is known as two varieties, var. tidestromii and layneae, in Marin, Monterey, and Sonoma Counties. The lupine is known from nineteen extant occurrences with only 433 individuals; two populations on the Monterey Peninsula were eliminated by the construction of a golf course. The major threats to L. tidestromii are invasion by non-native plants, and loss of habitat due to development, trampling by hikers and equestrians, and livestock grazing.

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Threats

Comments: Major threats are invasion by non-native plants, such as iceplant and European beachgrass and loss of habitat due to development, trampling by hikers and equestrians, and livestock grazing. Populations on private lands are potentially threatened by residential and recreational development (Fish and Wildlife Service 1997).

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Wikipedia

Lupinus tidestromii

Lupinus tidestromii, Tidestrom's lupine, is a rare species of lupine known by the common names clover lupine and Tidestrøm's lupine. It is endemic to the coastline of California just to the north and south of the Golden Gate in Sonoma, Marin, and Monterey Counties. It is a plant of the sand dunes at separate beach locations in these counties. A very limited amount of this plant's habitat remains; it is a federally listed endangered species. Construction of golf courses on the Monterey Peninsula caused the extirpation of two known occurrences, and boardwalks were built at Asilomar State Beach to prevent trampling of the delicate dune habitat there.[1]

This is a perennial herb producing a prostrate stem growing along the sand and reaching 10 to 30 centimeters in length. Each palmate leaf is made up of 3 to 5 leaflets measuring 1 or 2 centimeters in length. The herbage is coated in white woolly hairs. The small, upright inflorescence bears whorls of flowers each just over a centimeter in length. The flower is blue or purple with a white, yellow, or purplish patch on its banner. The fruit is a shaggy-haired legume pod 2 or 3 centimeters long.

References[edit]

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