Overview

Comprehensive Description

Miscellaneous Details

"Notes: Western Ghats, Cultivated, Native of Australia"
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Distribution

Tamil Nadu: Nilgiri
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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Diagnostic

Habit: Tree
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Allocasuarina littoralis

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Allocasuarina littoralis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 4
Specimens with Barcodes: 4
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Allocasuarina littoralis

Allocasuarina littoralis, commonly known as black sheoak, black she-oak, or river black-oak, is an endemic medium-sized Australian tree (usually up to 8 metres, but sometimes to 15 metres - coarse shrub in exposed maritime areas).[1][2] A. littoralis is named for its growth near the coast; this is somewhat misleading, as it will grow well both inland and in coastal zones.[3][4]

Description[edit]

This evergreen Casaurina tree is noted for its modified branchlets appearing to be leaves (5–8 cm long) and narrow width (no more than 4 mm) and the true leaves are, in fact minute (rarely larger than 1mm) and occur on the tips of the modified branchlets.[5] It is a relatively fast growing tree (up to 800mm. a year) making it very suitable for planting along roadsides. The showy red flowers appear in spring.[3]

Range[edit]

The species occurs in Queensland, New South Wales, Australian Capital Territory, Victoria, and Tasmania.[1] It grows in woodland and sometimes in tall heath, and it grows in sandy and other poor soils.[4]

Footnotes[edit]

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