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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Spiny shrub, to 4 m, sometimes prostrate. Leaves borne in fascicles on spiny side branches; lamina 2-5 cm × 4-7 mm, narrowly oblong to narrowly oblanceolate, dark green and becoming glabrous above, greyish-tomentose beneath; apex obtuse, mucronulate; margin rolled under, entire or obscurely toothed towards apex. Flowers c.8 mm across, white, in dense tomentose corymbs. Fruit 6-8 mm in diameter, subspherical, orange to brick-red.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Derivation of specific name

angustifolia: narrow-leaved
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Source: NatureServe

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Guizhou, Hubei, Sichuan, Xizang, Yunnan, Zhejiang.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Worldwide distribution

Native to China; naturalised in southern Africa
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Shrubs or small trees, to 4 m tall, often with thorny branches. Branchlets purplish brown when old, densely grayish yellow tomentose when young, glabrous when old. Petiole 1–2.5 mm or leaves sessile; leaf blade narrowly oblong to oblanceolate-oblong, 1.5–5 cm × 4–8 mm, abaxially densely gray tomentose, adaxially initially gray tomentose, soon glabrescent, base cuneate, margin entire, apex obtuse, apiculate, or emarginate. Compound corymb 2–4 cm diam., several flowered; peduncle densely gray tomentose; bracts caducous, lanceolate. Pedicel 1–2 mm, densely gray tomentose. Flowers ca. 2.5 mm in diam. Hypanthium campanulate, densely gray tomentose. Sepals triangular, 1–1.1 mm, abaxially densely gray tomentose, apex acute. Petals suborbicular, ca. 4 mm, apex rounded or emarginate. Stamens 20; filaments 1.5–2 mm. Ovary white tomentose; styles nearly as long as stamens. Pome reddish, depressed-globose, 5–6 mm in diam.; sepals persistent, erect. Fl. May–Jun, fr. Oct–Dec.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Cotoneaster angustifolius Franchet, Pl. Delavay. 221. 1890.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Ecology

Habitat

Thickets on slopes, at roadsides; 1600--3000 m.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

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Population Biology

Frequency

Local
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Pyracantha angustifolia

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 21
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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Source: NatureServe

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Pyracantha angustifolia

Pyracantha angustifolia: flowers and fruit.

Pyracantha angustifolia is a species of shrub in the rose family known by the common name narrowleaf firethorn. The flowers are white and produce small round pomes and can be orange to red in color. These fruits are astringent and bitter, making them inedible for humans, but they are a food source for birds. The leaves, fruit and seeds contain hydrogen cyanide, the source of the bitter taste.[1] The stems and branches have sharp spines. This shrub is cultivated and grown in yards and gardens as an ornamental plant. It can be used to make hedges for home security. This species is native to China but has been introduced to North America. It is an invasive species in Hawaii and in other areas.[2]

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