Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Physical Description

Type Information

Syntype for Prunus mitis Beadle
Catalog Number: US 391311
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): F. Earle & E. S. Earle
Year Collected: 1900
Locality: lee, Alabama, United States, North America
  • Syntype: Beadle, C. D. 1902. Biltmore Bot. Stud. 1 (2): 162.
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G4 - Apparently Secure

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Wikipedia

Prunus umbellata

Prunus umbellata, called Allegheny Plum, Flatwoods Plum, Hog Plum. and Sloe Plum, is a plum species native to the United States from Virginia, south to Florida, and west to Texas.[1][2]

It can reach 20 feet (6.1 m) in height with a 15 feet (4.6 m) spread. It has alternate serrate green leaves that turn yellow in Autumn. Flowers are white, creamy, or grayish. Fruits are round, purple, and 0.5–1 inch (1.3–2.5 cm) in diameter.[2] P. umbellata trees can live up to 40 years and are very difficult to distinguish from Prunus angustifolia, with which it hybridizes easily.[3] The trees bloom and bear fruit later then other plums. The fruits mature August-October. Large crops appear only every 3-4 years.[4]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ GRIN (May 4, 2011). "Prunus umbellata Elliott". Taxonomy for Plants. National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland: USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Retrieved December 28, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "Prunus umbellata: Flatwoods Plum". University of Florida IFAS Extension. Retrieved December 28, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Plum Delicious and Native, Too!". Florida Native Plant Society. July 15, 2011. Retrieved December 28, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Flatwoods Plum, Black Sloe, Sloe, Hog Plum". Texas A&M University. Retrieved December 28, 2014. 
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