Overview

Comprehensive Description

Reduviidae (Assassin Bugs)
Assassin Bugs are medium-sized insects. They have an oval-shaped abdominal area, over which is superimposed overlapping wings that create the appearance of an "X" on the back. They are variously colored, and have a small narrow head that projects outward from the body. The front two pairs of legs are longer and more powerful than the hind legs: they are used to grab and hold insect prey. Assassin bugs actively hunt and feed on a variety of insects, sucking out their bodily juices. They occasionally lurk near flowers to feed on bees and other insects.

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Ecology

Associations

Known prey organisms

Reduviidae (reduviids) preys on:
Phaenicia eximia
Hemilucilia segmentaria
Cochliomyia macellaria

Based on studies in:
Costa Rica (Carrion substrate)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • L. F. Jiron and V. M. Cartin, 1981. Insect succession in the decomposition of a mammal in Costa Rica. J. New York Entomol. Soc. 89:158-165, from p. 163.
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© SPIRE project

Source: SPIRE

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Evolution and Systematics

Functional Adaptations

Functional adaptation

Antennae sense heat of prey: Rhodnius bug
 

The antennae of Rhodnius bugs detect heat from their potential victims using numerous sensitive, hairlike thermoreceptors.

     
  "Rhodnius bugs are large, blood-sucking insects found throughout the Americas. They live in close proximity to their victims, in nests or burrows, and detect potential victims -- small, warm-blooded creatures such as mice -- by sensing their body heat. A Rhodnius bug has its own built-in thermometers on its antennae in the form of numerous exceedingly sensitive hairlike thermoreceptors, which can detect air that has been warmed by its prey's body heat." (Shuker 2001:38)
  Learn more about this functional adaptation.
  • Shuker, KPN. 2001. The Hidden Powers of Animals: Uncovering the Secrets of Nature. London: Marshall Editions Ltd. 240 p.
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© The Biomimicry Institute

Source: AskNature

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:1935
Specimens with Sequences:1201
Specimens with Barcodes:980
Species:303
Species With Barcodes:197
Public Records:543
Public Species:59
Public BINs:186
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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