Overview

Brief Summary

Description

Jetbead is a multi-stemmed deciduous shrub that was introduced from Central China, Korea and Japan in 1866 for ornamental purposes. Found in at least 17 states east of the Mississippi, it has recently come to the attention of land managers who noticed it becoming invasive in natural habitats away from intentional plantings. It is very shade tolerant and can do well in forest edges and interiors. Once established, it shades out native plants in the ground layer and inhibits native tree generation. Jetbead spreads by seed and by vegetative means. It can grow to 6 ft. in height and has opposite simple leaves 2½-4 in. long with doubly serrate toothed margins and conspicuous ribbed veins with long pointed tips. It flowers in the spring, producing white four-petaled flowers about 2 in. across. Small pale to red turning black, bead-like fruits are produced soon after flowering. Jetbead invades forests, creating a thick shrub layer that displaces native shrubs, shades out understory species and restricts tree seedling establishment.

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Distribution

National Distribution

United States

Origin: Exotic

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Anhui, Gansu, Henan, Hubei, Jiangsu, Liaoning, Shaanxi, Shandong, Zhejiang [Japan, Korea].
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Shrubs 0.5–2(3) m tall. Branchlets green when young, later brown, glabrous. Stipules pilose; petiole 2–5 mm, pilose; leaf blade 4–11 × 3–6 cm, abaxially sericeous when young, sparsely pilose on veins when old, adaxially pilose when young, glabrescent later, base rounded to subcordate, apex acuminate. Flowers 3–5 cm in diam. Sepals ovate-elliptic, sparsely sericeous distally, apex acute; epicalyx segments linear, 1/5–1/4 as long as sepals. Petals obovate, 1/4–1/3 as long as sepals. Drupes 1–4, brownish black, obliquely ellipsoid, ca. 8 mm. Fl. Apr–May, fr. Jun–Sep. 2n = 18.
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Diagnostic Description

Synonym

Corchorus scandens Thunberg, Trans. Linn. Soc. London 2: 335. 1794; Kerria tetrapetala Siebold; Rhodotypos kerrioides Siebold & Zuccarini; R. tetrapetala (Siebold) Makino.
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Ecology

Habitat

Forests on mountain slopes or in valleys; 100--800 m.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Rhodotypos scandens

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Rhodotypos scandens

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 3
Specimens with Barcodes: 9
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNA - Not Applicable

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Rhodotypos

Rhodotypos scandens, the sole species of the genus Rhodotypos, is a deciduous shrub in the family Rosaceae, closely related to Kerria and included in that genus by some botanists. It is native to China, possibly also Japan.

It grows to 2-5 m tall, with (unusually for a species in the Rosaceae) opposite (not alternate) leaves, simple ovate-acute, 3-6 cm long and 2-4 cm broad with a serrated margin. The flowers are white, 3-4 cm diameter, and (also unusually) have four (not five) petals; flowering is from late spring to mid-summer. The fruit is a cluster of 1-4 shiny black drupes 5-8 mm diameter.

It does not have a widely used English name, most commonly being known by its genus name Rhodotypos, also occasionally as Jetbead or Jet-bead. It is an invasive species in some parts of eastern North America.

References and external links[edit]

  1. ^ Potter, D. et al.; Eriksson, T.; Evans, R. C.; Oh, S.; Smedmark, J. E. E.; Morgan, D. R.; Kerr, M.; Robertson, K. R. et al. (2007). "Phylogeny and classification of Rosaceae". Plant Systematics and Evolution 266 (1–2): 5–43. doi:10.1007/s00606-007-0539-9.  [Referring to the subfamily by the name "Spiraeoideae"]
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Notes

Comments

This species is used medicinally and cultivated for ornament.
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