Overview

Comprehensive Description

Derivation of specific name

indica: of India
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Distribution

Anhui, Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hainan, Hunan, Jiangxi, Taiwan, Yunnan, Zhejiang [Cambodia, Japan, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam].
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Shrubs, rarely small trees, to 4 m tall. Branchlets purplish brown when young, grayish brown when old, terete, initially brown tomentose, glabrous when old. Petiole 0.5–1.8 cm or nearly absent, slightly brown tomentose or, subglabrous; stipules caducous, lanceolate, sparsely brown tomentose, apex acuminate; leaf blade ovate, oblong, rarely obovate, oblong-lanceolate, narrowly elliptic or lanceolate-elliptic, (2–)4–8 × 1.5–4 cm, leathery, veins prominent abaxially, reticulate veins conspicuous abaxially and conspicuous or not adaxially, abaxially pale, glabrous or sparsely tomentose, adaxially lustrous, glabrous, base attenuate, margin crenulate, serrate, or obtusely serrate, apex obtuse, acute, acuminate, or long caudate. Panicle or racemes terminal, many- or few flowered; peduncle and pedicels rusty tomentose; bracts and bractlets caducous, lanceolate or narrowly lanceolate, 2–7 mm, both surfaces initially brown tomentose, densely so at margin, soon glabrescent, apex acuminate. Pedicel 0.5–1.5 cm, initially brown tomentose, soon glabrescent. Flowers 1–1.3(–1.5) cm in diam. Hypanthium tubular, brown tomentose at margin and on both surfaces or glabrous. Sepals triangular-lanceolate or linear, 4.5–6 mm, both surfaces slightly brown tomentose or glabrous, apex acute. Petals white or pinkish, obovate or lanceolate, 5–7 × 4–5 mm, pubescent basally, apex obtuse. Stamens 15, ca. as long as or shorter than petals. Ovary glabrous, 2- or 3-loculed, with 2 ovules per locule; styles 2 or 3, connate at base, subglabrous. Pome purplish black, globose, 5–8 mm in diam., glabrous; fruiting pedicel 5–10 mm, glabrous; sepals caducous, leaving an annular ring. Fl. Apr, fr. Jul–Aug.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Ecology

Habitat

Slopes, roadsides, thickets at stream sides; 700--1600 m.
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© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO, 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Rhaphiolepis indica

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Rhaphiolepis indica

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 4
Specimens with Barcodes: 16
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Rhaphiolepis indica

Indian Hawthorn or India Hawthorn (Rhaphiolepis indica) is an evergreen shrub in the family Rosaceae. The species is native to an area from southern China, Japan, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam.[1] It is grown for its decorative pink flowers, and is popular in bonsai culture. The fruit is edible when cooked, and can be used to make jam.

Indian Hawthorn is a mainstay horticultural specimen in southern United States. It is often found in commercial as well as in private landscapes. Often it is trimmed into small compact hedges or balls for foundation plants. It has been successfully pruned into a standard form as well as small dwarf-like trees up to 15 feet in height. It is apt to develop leaf spot.

An Indian Hawthorn bush at a distance

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cuizhi Gu, Chaoluan Li, Lingdi Lu, Shunyuan Jiang, Crinan Alexander, Bruce Bartholomew, Anthony R. Brach, David E. Boufford, Hiroshi Ikeda, Hideaki Ohba, Kenneth R. Robertson, and Steven A. Spongberg. "Rhaphiolepis indica". Flora of China 9. 
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