Overview

Comprehensive Description

Comments

This native rose can be distinguished from the exotic Rosa multiflora (Multiflora Rose) by the lack of comb-like hairs on the stipules at the base of its compound leaves. It also differs from Multiflora Rose by having larger flowers that are more pink and by having fewer leaflets per compound leaf. Other native roses in Illinois are small shrubs that don't have the climbing habit of Rosa setigera (Wild Climbing Rose). They also have more leaflets per compound leaf than the latter species, and they have a flat button of pistils at the center of each flower, instead of a narrow column of pistils. Return
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Source: Illinois Wildflowers

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Description

This is a woody vine that is 4-12' long. In open areas, the Climbing Wild Rose ascends about 3' and arches downward to reroot in the ground, while in more wooded areas it tends to climb over neighboring vegetation. The prickles along the woody stems are short, stout, and slightly curved. They are not particularly numerous. The alternate compound leaves usually consist of 3 leaflets, or less often 5 leaflets. Each leaflet is about 2-3" long and 1-1½" across, with a rather long and pointed tip. The shape is ovate to slightly lanceolate, with deep conspicuous veins, and finely serrate margins. At the base of each compound leaf are two winged stipules without comb-like hairs.  The flowers appear in small clusters from early to mid-summer and bloom for about a month. Each flower is about 2½-3" across, and consists of 5 light pink to rosy pink petals, numerous golden stamens, and pistils that form a small column in the center. The flowers have a typical rose fragrance. Later in the summer, bright red rose hips appear. The root system consists of a taproot that branches occasionally, and is usually quite deep. This vine reproduces by seed or suckering of the stems.
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Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Locally common in the southeastern Great Plains (Great Plains Flora Association, 1986). From Florida to Texas, north to New York, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, and Kansas (Correll, 1970). Occasional to common throughout Illinois (Mohlenbrock, 1986).

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Ecology

Associations

Faunal Associations

The most common visitors to the flowers are various bees and Syrphid flies. Bees collect pollen, and typical visitors include honeybees, bumblebees, Anthophorine bees, Miner bees, large Leaf-Cutting bees, and Halictine bees. Syrphid flies feed on pollen, and are not effective pollinators. Various beetles and moth caterpillars feed on the foliage and flowers (see Moth Table for the latter). In some areas, Japanese Beetles can be troublesome. The rose hips are eaten by various small mammals and birds, including the Greater Prairie Chicken, while the stems and foliage are browsed by the Cottontail Rabbit and White-Tailed Deer (particularly the latter), notwithstanding the occasional prickles. Photographic Location
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Flower-Visiting Insects of Wild Climbing Rose in Illinois

Rosa setigera (Wild Climbing Rose)
(Bees collect pollen; other insects feed on pollen; Syrphid flies are usually non-pollinating; some observations are from MacRae as indicated below, otherwise observations are from Robertson)

Bees (long-tongued)
Apidae (Apinae): Apis mellifera cp fq; Apidae (Bombini): Bombus auricomus cp, Bombus griseocallis cp fq, Bombus impatiens cp, Bombus pensylvanica cp fq; Anthophoridae (Anthophorini): Anthophora abrupta cp fq; Anthophoridae (Eucerini): Synhalonia rosae cp olg, Synhalonia speciosa cp fq; Megachilidae (Megachilini): Megachile addenda cp, Megachile latimanus cp, Megachile mendica cp fq; Megachilidae (Osmiini): Osmia pumila cp

Bees (short-tongued)
Halictidae (Halictinae): Agapostemon sericea cp, Agapostemon virescens cp fq, Augochloropsis metallica metallica cp, Lasioglossum cinctipes cp, Lasioglossum coriaceus cp fq, Lasioglossum versatus cp

Flies
Syrphidae: Allograpta obliqua fp np, Chalcosyrphus violascens fp np, Eristalis transversus fp, Eupeodes americanus fp fq np, Heringia salax fp np, Mallota bautias fp fq, Mallota posticata fp, Milesia virginiensis fp fq, Myolepta nigra fp np, Syritta pipiens fp np, Temnostoma trifasciatum fp np, Trichopsomyia banksi fp np, Xylota angustiventris fp np; Bombyliidae: Anthrax albofasciatus fp, Anthrax oedipus fp, Hemipenthes sinuosa fp

Beetles
Buprestidae: Acmaeodera neglecta fp (McR), Acmaeodera ornata fp (McR), Acmaeodera tubulus fp (McR); Scarabaeidae (Cetonniae): Trichiotinus piger fp

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Barcode data: Rosa setigera

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Rosa setigera

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N3 - Vulnerable

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N4 - Apparently Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Cultivation

The preference is full or partial sun and loamy, fertile soil. This plant prefers soil that is evenly moist or mesic – it dislikes wet conditions with standing water or droughty conditions. During dry, hot weather there is a tendency for the leaves to become yellowish green and growth may be stunted. Range & Habitat
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