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Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: ME to B.C., south to GA, MO, AZ, and CA. Sparse.

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B.C., N.S., Ont., Que.; Ala., Ariz., Ark., Calif., Colo., Conn., Del., D.C., Fla., Ga., Idaho, Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kans., Ky., La., Maine, Md., Mass., Mich., Minn., Miss., Mo., Mont., Nebr., N.H., N.J., N.Mex., N.Y., N.C., Ohio., Okla., Oreg., Pa., R.I., S.C., Tenn., Tex., Vt., Va., Wash., W.Va., Wis.; Mexico; Central America (Honduras).
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Herbs, perennial, cespitose, not rhizomatous, 1.4--10 dm. Culms erect, terete, 1--3 mm diam., smooth. Cataphylls 1--2, gray, apex acute. Leaves: basal 1--2, cauline 1--2; auricles 1--1.5 mm, apex rounded, scarious; blade green, straw-colored, or pink, nearly terete, 1--40 cm. Inflorescences terminal panicles of 5--50 heads, 5--15 cm, branches ascending; primary bract erect; heads (2--)5--20(--50)-flowered, hemispheric (to spheric), 3--10 mm diam. Flowers: tepals light brown to greenish, lanceolate, 2.6--3.5(--3.9) mm, apex acuminate; stamens 3 (or 6), anthers 1/3 filament length. Capsules equaling perianth or slightly exserted, straw-colored, 1-locular, ellipsoid to narrowly ovoid, 2.8--3.5(--4) mm, apex acute, valves separating at dehiscence, fertile throughout or only proximal to middle. Seeds ellipsoid to oblong, 0.3--0.4 mm, not tailed; body clear yellow-brown. 2n = 40.
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Diagnostic Description

The septate leaves and flowers subtended by a single bract and having only 3 stamens separate J. ACUMINATUS from our other non-rhizomatous rushes. JUNCUS is a large and difficult genus to distinguish, so a technical key should be consulted. Mature fruit is necessary for positive determination.

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Synonym

Juncus acuminatus var. legitimus Engelmann; J. pallescens E. Meyer ex Buchenau; J. pondii A. W. Wood
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Ecology

Habitat

Shores, swamps, ditches, springs, wet meadows, and rock outcrops; 0--2200m.
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Life History and Behavior

Cyclicity

Flowering/Fruiting

Fruiting early summer--fall.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Juncus acuminatus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

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Wikipedia

Juncus acuminatus

Juncus acuminatus is a species of rush known by the common names Tapertip Rush, Tufted Rush and Sharp-fruited Rush. It is native to North and Central America, where it can be found in and around water bodies from central Canada to Honduras. It is a rhizomatous perennial herb forming clumps up to about 80 centimeters tall. The inflorescence is an open array of many clusters of up to 20 flowers each. The flower has pointed segments a few millimeters long which may be light reddish brown to greenish in color.

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