Overview

Distribution

Anhui, Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Jiangsu, Jiangxi, S Shaanxi, Yunnan, Zhejiang [Japan].
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Physical Description

Morphology

Description

Shrubs deciduous, to 15 m tall, usually with slender thorns 5–8 mm. Branchlets purplish brown when young, grayish brown when old, terete, initially pubescent, glabrous when old; buds purplish brown, triangular-ovoid, glabrous, apex obtuse. Stipules falcate, large, 5–8 mm, herbaceous, glabrous, margin serrate, apex acute; petiole 4–5 mm, narrowly winged or not, glabrous; leaf blade broadly obovate to obovate-oblong or obovate-elliptic, 2–6 × 1–4.5 cm, abaxially sparsely pubescent, densely so along veins, glabrescent, with conspicuous veins, adaxially glabrous, base cuneate or attenuate, margin irregularly doubly serrate or serrate, 3-lobed, rarely 5-lobed in apical part or not lobed, apex acute. Corymb 2–2.5 cm in diam., 5–7-flowered, peduncle pubescent; bracts caducous, lanceolate, herbaceous. Pedicel ca. 1 cm, pubescent. Flowers ca. 1 cm in diam. Hypanthium campanulate, abaxially pubescent. Sepals triangular-ovate, ca. 4 mm, both surfaces villous. Petals white, suborbicular or obovate, 6–7 mm. Stamens 20. Ovary pubescent apically, 5-loculed , with 2 ovules per locule; styles 4 or 5, tomentose basally. Pome red or yellow, subglobose or depressed-globose, 1–2 cm in diam., glabrous; sepals often persistent, reflexed; pyrenes 4 or 5, smooth on both inner sides. Fl. May–Jun, fr. Sep–Nov. 2n = 34*.
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Ecology

Habitat

Valleys, thickets; 200--2000 m.
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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Crataegus cuneata

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 2
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Wikipedia

Crataegus cuneata

Crataegus cuneata is a species of hawthorn known by the common names Chinese hawthorn[2] (Chinese: 山楂; pinyin: Shan zha) or Japanese hawthorn. It is native to China, and is widely cultivated in Japan. It is used for bonsai. The fruit can be red or yellow.[3]

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References and external links

  1. ^ Phipps, J.B.; Robertson, K.R.; Smith, P.G.; Rohrer, J.R. (1990). A checklist of the subfamily Maloideae (Rosaceae). Canadian Journal of Botany. 68(10): 2209–2269.
  2. ^ "PLANTS Profile for Crataegus cuneata Siebold & Zucc. (Chinese hawthorn)". Natural Resources Conservation Service. United States Department of Agriculture. http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=CRCU6. Retrieved 11 October 2011.
  3. ^ Flora of China
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