Overview

Distribution

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Dryas octopetala L.:
China (Asia)
Greenland (North America)
United States (North America)
Japan (Asia)
South Korea (Asia)
Russian Federation (Asia)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)

© Missouri Botanical Garden, 4344 Shaw Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA

Source: Missouri Botanical Garden

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 1 person

Average rating: 2.0 of 5

Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / mycorrhiza / ectomycorrhiza
fruitbody of Boletus edulis is ectomycorrhizal with live root of Dryas octopetala

In Great Britain and/or Ireland:
Foodplant / mycorrhiza / ectomycorrhiza
fruitbody of Boletus luridiformis var. luridiformis is ectomycorrhizal with live root of Dryas octopetala

Foodplant / mycorrhiza / ectomycorrhiza
fruitbody of Boletus luridus is ectomycorrhizal with live root of Dryas octopetala

Foodplant / saprobe
immersed perithecium of Cainiella johansonii is saprobic on leaf petiole of Dryas octopetala
Remarks: season: 6-8

Foodplant / mycorrhiza / ectomycorrhiza
fruitbody of Cantharellus aurora is ectomycorrhizal with live root of Dryas octopetala

Plant / associate
fruitbody of Clitocybe subdryadicola is associated with Dryas octopetala

Foodplant / mycorrhiza / ectomycorrhiza
fruitbody of Cortinarius atrovirens is ectomycorrhizal with live root of Dryas octopetala
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Foodplant / mycorrhiza / ectomycorrhiza
fruitbody of Cortinarius caesiocanescens is ectomycorrhizal with live root of Dryas octopetala
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Foodplant / mycorrhiza / ectomycorrhiza
fruitbody of Cortinarius calochrous var. coniferarum is ectomycorrhizal with live root of Dryas octopetala
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Foodplant / mycorrhiza / ectomycorrhiza
fruitbody of Cortinarius mussivus is ectomycorrhizal with live root of Dryas octopetala

Foodplant / mycorrhiza / ectomycorrhiza
fruitbody of Cortinarius odorifer is ectomycorrhizal with live root of Dryas octopetala
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Foodplant / mycorrhiza / ectomycorrhiza
fruitbody of Cortinarius spilomeus is ectomycorrhizal with live root of Dryas octopetala

Foodplant / saprobe
hypophyllous apothecium of Grahamiella dryadis is saprobic on leaf hairs of Dryas octopetala
Remarks: season: 6-8

Plant / associate
fruitbody of Hebeloma mesophaeum var. mesophaeum is associated with root of Dryas octopetala
Remarks: captive: in captivity, culture, or experimentally induced

Foodplant / mycorrhiza / ectomycorrhiza
fruitbody of Inocybe catalaunica is ectomycorrhizal with live root of Dryas octopetala
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Foodplant / spot causer
epiphyllous, immersed, pseudostromatic, clypeate perithecium of Isothea rhytismoides causes spots on live leaf of Dryas octopetala

Foodplant / mycorrhiza / ectomycorrhiza
fruitbody of Lactarius salicis-reticulatae is ectomycorrhizal with live root of Dryas octopetala
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Foodplant / saprobe
epiphyllous, immersed pseudothecium of Mycosphaerella octopetalae is saprobic on dead leaf of Dryas octopetala
Remarks: season: 6-7

Foodplant / parasite
anamorph of Podosphaera volkartii parasitises live leaf of Dryas octopetala
Other: minor host/prey

Foodplant / saprobe
immersed perithecium of Pseudomassaria islandica is saprobic on leaf of Dryas octopetala
Remarks: season: 6-9

Foodplant / mycorrhiza / ectomycorrhiza
fruitbody of Russula nana is ectomycorrhizal with live root of Dryas octopetala
Remarks: Other: uncertain

Foodplant / parasite
epiphyllous thyriothecium of Stomiopeltis dryadis parasitises live leaf of Dryas octopetala
Remarks: season: 5-6

Foodplant / saprobe
erumpent pseudothecium of Wettsteinina dryadis is saprobic on pedicel of Dryas octopetala
Remarks: season: 7

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Dryas octopetala

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 11
Specimens with Barcodes: 18
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Conservation

Conservation Status

NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: N5 - Secure

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© NatureServe

Source: NatureServe

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Dryas octopetala

Dryas octopetala (common names include mountain avens, white dryas, and white dryad) is an Arctic–alpine flowering plant in the family Rosaceae. It is a small prostrate evergreen subshrub forming large colonies. The specific epithet octopetala derives from the Greek octo (eight) and petalon (petal), referring to the eight petals of the flower, an unusual number in the Rosaceae, where five is the normal number. However, flowers with up to 16 petals also occur naturally.

Distribution[edit]

Dryas octopetala has a widespread occurrence throughout mountainous areas where it is generally restricted to limestone outcrops. These include the entire Arctic, as well as the mountains of Scandinavia, Iceland, the Alps, Carpathian Mountains, Balkans, Caucasus and in isolated locations elsewhere. In Great Britain it occurs in the Pennines (northern England), at two locations in Snowdonia (north Wales), and more widely in the Scottish Highlands; in Ireland it occurs on The Burren and a few other sites. In North America it is found in Alaska, most frequently on previously glaciated terrain, reaching as far south as Colorado in the Rocky Mountains.

It is the official territorial flower of the Northwest Territories, and the national flower of Iceland.

Description[edit]

The stems are woody, tortuous, with short, horizontal rooting branches. The leaves are glabrous above, densely white-tomentose beneath. The flowers are produced on stalks 3–10 cm (1.2–3.9 in) long, and have eight creamy white petals - hence the specific epithet octopetala.[1] The style is persistent on the fruit with white feathery hairs, functioning as a wind-dispersal agent. The feathery hairs of the seed head first appear twisted together and glossy before spreading out to an expanded ball which the wind quickly disperses.

It grows in dry localities where snow melts early, on gravel and rocky barrens, forming a distinct heath community on calcareous soils.

Climatology[edit]

The Younger Dryas, Older Dryas and Oldest Dryas stadials are named after Dryas octopetala, because of the great quantities of its pollen found in cores dating from those times. During these cold spells, Dryas octopetala was much more widely distributed than it is today, as large parts of the northern hemisphere that are now covered by forests were replaced in the cold periods by tundra.

Cultivation[edit]

D. octopetala is cultivated in temperate regions as groundcover, or as an alpine or rock garden plant. It has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[2] The leaves are occasionally used as a herbal tea.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Harrison, Lorraine (2012). RHS Latin for gardeners. United Kingdom: Mitchell Beazley. p. 224. ISBN 9781845337315. 
  2. ^ "Dryas octopetala". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 25 July 2013. 

Further reading[edit]

Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Unreviewed

Article rating from 0 people

Average rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!