Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

 Manayunkia aestuarina is a small, colourless or brown, sabellid fanworm reaching up to 6 mm in length. Eight yellow ciliated tentacles (pinnules) and two green ciliated palps project from the head of the worm. The mouth is located beneath the palps and there is a black eye spot either side of the head (prostomium). The rest of the body comprises eight thoracic and three abdominal segments. Bristles on the thoracic segments are lance-like and short. Manayunkia aestuarina bind sand and mud particles together to form a tube roughly twice the length of the animal.Manayunkia aestuarina is the only species of this genus to be found around British coasts.
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Distribution

In surface mud in estuaries, locally abundant.
  • Hayward, P.J.; Ryland, J.S. (Ed.) (1990). The marine fauna of the British Isles and North-West Europe: 1. Introduction and protozoans to arthropods. Clarendon Press: Oxford, UK. ISBN 0-19-857356-1. 627 pp.
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Magdalen Islands (from Eastern Bradelle valley to the west, as far as Cape North, including the Cape Breton Channel)
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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National Distribution

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 145 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 6 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 98
  Temperature range (°C): 12.220 - 26.823
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.632 - 3.867
  Salinity (PPS): 30.381 - 36.175
  Oxygen (ml/l): 4.582 - 6.395
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.076 - 0.669
  Silicate (umol/l): 2.068 - 16.169

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 98

Temperature range (°C): 12.220 - 26.823

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.632 - 3.867

Salinity (PPS): 30.381 - 36.175

Oxygen (ml/l): 4.582 - 6.395

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.076 - 0.669

Silicate (umol/l): 2.068 - 16.169
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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 Manayunkia aestuarina are characteristic of brackish water and found sublittorally in sandy and muddy estuaries to depths of 30 m in sediment.
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Associations

Known predators

Manayunkia aestuarina is prey of:
Pomatoschistus microps
Pleuronectes platessa
Platichthys flesus

Based on studies in:
Scotland (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Hall SJ, Raffaelli D (1991) Food-web patterns: lessons from a species-rich web. J Anim Ecol 60:823–842
  • Huxham M, Beany S, Raffaelli D (1996) Do parasites reduce the chances of triangulation in a real food web? Oikos 76:284–300
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Known prey organisms

Manayunkia aestuarina preys on:
POM

Based on studies in:
Scotland (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Hall SJ, Raffaelli D (1991) Food-web patterns: lessons from a species-rich web. J Anim Ecol 60:823–842
  • Huxham M, Beany S, Raffaelli D (1996) Do parasites reduce the chances of triangulation in a real food web? Oikos 76:284–300
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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