Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / parasite
aecioid, amphigenous telium of Endophyllum sempervivi parasitises live leaf of Echeveria

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
                                        
Specimen Records:87Public Records:3
Specimens with Sequences:85Public Species:3
Specimens with Barcodes:81Public BINs:0
Species:63         
Species With Barcodes:63         
          
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Locations of barcode samples

Collection Sites: world map showing specimen collection locations for Echeveria

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Echeveria sp.

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 10
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Echeveria

Echeveria is a large genus of flowering plants in the Crassulaceae family, native to semi-desert areas of Central America, from Mexico to northwestern South America. The genus is named after the 18th century Mexican botanical artist Atanasio Echeverría y Godoy.

Description[edit]

Plants may be evergreen or deciduous. Flowers on short stalks (cymes) arise from compact rosettes of succulent fleshy, often brightly coloured leaves.[2] Species are polycarpic, meaning that they may flower and set seed many times over the course of their lifetimes. Often numerous offsets are produced, and are commonly known as "hen and chicks", which can also refer to other genera, such as Sempervivum, that are significantly different from Echeveria.

Cultivation[edit]

E. pulvinata flowers

Many Echeveria species are popular as ornamental garden plants. They are drought-resistant, although they do better with regular deep watering and fertilizing. Most will tolerate shade and some frost, although hybrids tend to be less tolerant. Most lose their lower leaves in winter; as a result, after a few years, the plants lose their attractive, compact appearance and need to be re-rooted or propagated. In addition, if not removed, the shed leaves may decay, harboring fungus that can then infect the plant.

Propagation[edit]

They can be propagated easily by separating offsets, but also by leaf cuttings, and by seed if they are not hybrids.

Selected species[edit]

Cultivars and Hybrids[edit]

Echeveria has been extensively bred and hybridised. The following is a selection of available plants.

  • "Arlie Wright"
  • "Black Prince"
  • "Blue Heron"
  • "Blue Surprise" (E. × gilva)
  • "Dondo"
  • "Doris Taylor"
  • "Ebony" (E. agavoides cultivar)
  • "Frank Reinelt"
  • "Hoveyi"
  • "Lipstick" (E. agavoides cultivar)
  • "Oliver" (E. pulvinata cultivar)
  • "Opalina"
  • "Painted Lady"
  • "Perle von Nürnberg"
  • "Red" (E. × gilva)
  • "Ruberia"
  • "Set-Oliver"
  • "Tippy"
  • "Victor Reiter" (E. agavoides cultivar)
  • "Wavy Curls"
  • "Worfield Wonder" (E. × derosa)

"Perle von Nürnberg"[5] has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.

Formerly in Echeveria[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Genus: Echeveria DC.". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 2003-06-13. Retrieved 2011-10-21. 
  2. ^ RHS A-Z encyclopedia of garden plants. United Kingdom: Dorling Kindersley. 2008. p. 1136. ISBN 1405332964. 
  3. ^ "Echeveria". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 2011-10-21. 
  4. ^ a b "GRIN Species Records of Echeveria". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2011-10-21. 
  5. ^ "RHS Plant Selector – Echeveria "Perle von Nürnberg"". Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
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