Physical Description

Type Information

Holotype for Coccoloba cyclophylla S.F. Blake
Catalog Number: US 537207
Collection: Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany
Verification Degree: Original publication and alleged type specimen examined
Preparation: Pressed specimen
Collector(s): H. M. Curran
Year Collected: 1916
Locality: San Martin de Loba & vicinity., Bolívar, Colombia, South America
  • Holotype: Blake, S. F. 1919. Contr. U.S. Natl. Herb. 20: 238.
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© Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Department of Botany

Source: National Museum of Natural History Collections

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Coccoloba caracasana

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 6
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Coccoloba caracasana

Coccoloba caracasana (from Greek kokkolobis, the ancient name given to a vine by the appearance of its fruit) is a tree in the family Polygonaceae. It is known by the common name Papaturro.

Contents

General description

Vegetative

This is a small to medium tree, often with multiple trunks, puberulent to glabrescent stems. The leaves are broadly oblong or suborbicular, rounded to truncate to subcordate at the base.

Reproductive

The flowers are small, greenish and fragrant, arranged in racemose inflorescences clustered in terminal and lateral spikes. The fruit is an achene with a semipulpous edible flesh.

Economic and ecological aspects

The distribution of this tree ranges from El Salvador to Panama and northern South America, where it is most common in the Pacific regions. It prefers sandy, loose and wet soil; it may be found along rivers. Economically, the species is useful for its edible fruit. The wood is used as firewood and for poles. The foliage is ornamental and hung for shade.

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