Overview

Distribution

National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

United States

Origin: Native

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Present

Confidence: Confident

Type of Residency: Year-round

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Life History and Behavior

Behavior

Aggressiveness in mating

These water striders have been used in experiments to understand the evolution of selfish behavior. Males who harass females drive them away, and so mating success is reduced for all males in a pool. Recent experiments show that when in the same pool, aggressive males have greater mating success than non-aggressive males. But the overall mating success of such a mixed pool is one-third of the success in a pool without aggressive males. This finding illustrates how natural selection can favor aggression even when it would seem a bad strategy -- a "tragedy of the commons." (Eldakar et al. 2009)

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Aquarius remigis

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 5
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: GNR - Not Yet Ranked

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Wikipedia

Aquarius remigis

Aquarius remigis, known as the common water strider, is a species of aquatic bug.[2][3] It was formerly known as Gerris remigis, but the subgenus Aquarius was elevated to generic rank in 1990 on the basis of phylogenetic analysis.[4][5] Aquarius remigis is found throughout North America, but is most prevalent in the mid-west of the United States.[6]

Description[edit]

Aquarius remigis grows slightly longer than .5 inches, and is dark brown to black in colour. It has a sharp rostrum that it uses to pierce the body of its prey and suck out the insides.[7]

Behaviour[edit]

They normally continue to move to avoid being eaten by predators. It has good vision, and can row quickly over the surface of the water. It uses its front legs to seize its prey.[7]

During breeding season, this species can communicate with potential mates by sending ripples over on the surface of the water.[7]

Adult females normally lay their eggs on plant stems at the water's edge.[7]

Diet[edit]

This predatory species feeds on mosquito larvae living under the surface, and dead insects on the surface, and other insects that accidentally land on the water.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Andersen, Nils Møller (1990). "Phylogeny and taxonomy of water striders, genus Aquarius Schellenberg (Insecta, Hemiptera, Gerridae), with a new species from Australia". Steenstrupia 16 (4): 37–81.  Abstract
  2. ^ "Water Strider Gerris remigis - Aquarius remigis". BugGuide.Net. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  3. ^ Wilcox, R. Stimson (1979-12-14). "Sex Discrimination in Gerris remigis: Role of a Surface Wave Signal". Sciencemag.org. Retrieved 2011-08-29. 
  4. ^ Kaitala, Arja, and Dingle, Hugh (1993). "Wing dimorphism, territoriality and mating frequency of the waterstrider Aquarius remigis (Say)". Annales Zoologici Fennici 30 (2): 163–168. Archived from the original on 13 January 2014. 
  5. ^ Gallant, Sharon L. and Fairbairn, Daphne J. (1996). "A New Species of Aquarius from the Southeastern United States, with Electrophoretic Analysis of the Clade Containing Gerris, Limnoporus, and Aquarius (Hemiptera: Gerridae)". Annals of the Entomological Society of America 89 (5): 637–644.  Abstract
  6. ^ Maps Aquarius remigis at the Encyclopedia of Life
  7. ^ a b c d e "Common Water Strider, Gerris remigis". Island Creek Elementary School. Archived from the original on 21 October 2013. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Fairbairn, D. J. 1985. A test of the hypothesis of compensatory upstream dispersal using a stream-dwelling waterstrider, Gerris remigis Say. Oecologia 66:147-153.
  • Fairbairn, D. J. 1985. Comparative ecology of Gerris remigis (Hemiptera, Heteroptera) in two habitats: a paradox of habitat choice. Canadian Journal of Zoology 63:2594-2603.
  • Fairbairn, D. J. 1986. Does alary dimorphism imply dispersal dimorphism in the waterstrider, Gerris remigis? Ecological Entomology 11:355-368.
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