Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records: 15
Specimens with Sequences: 16
Specimens with Barcodes: 6
Species: 4
Species With Barcodes: 4
Public Records: 3
Public Species: 2
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Wikipedia

Scopolia

This article is about the plant genus Scopolia. For the moth genus Scopolia, see Scopolia (moth).

Scopolia is a genus of five species of flowering plants in the family Solanaceae, native to Europe and Asia. The genus is named after Giovanni Scopoli (1723-88), a Tyrolean naturalist.

Scopolia carniolica is a creeping perennial plant, with light green leaves and pale yellow to dull red flowers. It is sometimes cultivated as a decorative plant. Scopolia's extract (which contains a form of the alkaloid scopolamine) is used in at least one commercial stomach remedy (Inosea, produced by Sato Pharmaceutical). The extract is an anti-spasmodic in low doses and may be used to relax smooth muscle tissue or prevent motion-sickness induced nausea; in higher doses it is a poisonous narcotic having hallucinogenic and memory-inhibiting effects.

Other alkaloids found in Scopolia carniolica include cuscohygrine and hyoscyamine.

Alkaloids found in Scopolia tangutica include hyoscyamine, scopolamine, anisodamine, and anisodine.

Alkaloids found in Scopolia atropoides (possibly just a synonym for Scopolia carniolica) include atroscine.

Scopoliae Rhizoma(root of Scopolia japonica)

The coumarin phenylpropanoids umbelliferone and scopoletin have been isolated from the roots of Scopolia japonica.

The related species Atropanthe sinensis is sometimes included in Scopolia as Scopolia sinensis.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Germplasm Resources Information Network Scopolia

Further reading[edit]

  • Ben-Wyk, Erik; & Wink, Michael (2004). Medicinal Plants of the World. Timber Press. ISBN 0-88192-602-7. 
  • Huang, Kee Chang; & Williams, Walter (1999). The pharmacology of Chinese herbs. CRC Press. ISBN 0-8493-1665-0. 
  • D'Arcy, William G. (1986). Solanaceae. Columbia University Press. ISBN 0-231-05780-6. 
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