Overview

Distribution

Range: 41.6°N to 27°S; 97.38°W to 34.9°W. Distribution: USA: Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida; Florida: East Florida, West Florida; USA: Louisiana, Texas; Mexico; Mexico: Tabasco, Veracruz, Campeche State, Yucatan State, Quintana Roo; Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, Venezuela; Venezuela: Gulf of Venezuela; Jamaica; Virgin Islands: St. Croix; Brazil; Brazil: Para, Maranhao, Ceara, Rio Grande do Norte, Pernambuco, Alagoas, Bahia, Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Parana, Santa Catarina
  • North-West Atlantic Ocean species (NWARMS)
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Geographic Range

Nassarius vibex, commonly known as the Common Eastern Nassa, can be found from Cape Cod to Florida, the Gulf States, and the West Indies. This Nassarius species can also be found in Brazil. Even though the Common Eastern Nassa is widely dispersed, it spends most of its time either in Florida or in the Caribbean. (Warmke and Abbott 1962; "Livestock" 4/28/01; "Nassariidae" 4/10/01; "Nassarius vibex" 4/19/01; "An Alternative to Hermit Crabs!" 4/19/01)

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Source: Animal Diversity Web

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Physical Description

Morphology

Physical Description

The Common Eastern Nassa can be anywhere from 10mm to 1 cm long, when the Nassa is an adult. The shell that is its home has a pointed "cone-shaped" spiral. The shell can be white to yellow to light or dark brown. Usually, there are either ridges or bumps on the shell as well. The shells are distinguished by a groove in the front, lower part of the shell. There can be varied colorations of the shell. Some people may think that two Common Eastern Nassas are actuallly different species because of the different colorations, when in fact, it is the same species. Some dark color bands may also be visible on the shells. Scientists believe that Nassarius vibex has twelve longitudinal ribs that are crossed with finer revolving threads. Also, this Nassa has the ability to extend its mouth so it is almost as long as the length of its body. When this occurs, it looks like an elephant's trunk. From research, scientists have determined that Nassarius vibex can live for several years. (Warmke and Abbott 1962; "Livestock" 4/28/01; Mann, Roger and Juliana Harding April 17, 2001; "Nassarius vibex" 4/19/01; "Nassariidae" April 10, 2001; "An Alternative to Hermit Crabs!" 4/19/01)

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Ecology

Habitat

Nassarius vibex is most commonly found living in the intertidal sand flats or in mud flats. This species can also be found living in very shallow waters and in creek banks. Most of the time, Nassarius vibex is buried under the sand or the mud. Because of where the Common Eastern Nassa lives, it lives at normal reef temperatures and conditions. (Warmke and Abbott 1962; June 9, 1997. "List of common Georgia seashells by habitat"; "Nassarius vibex" 4/19/01; "Flats - The Unvegetated Intertidal" 4/19/01; "Nassarius vibex" 4/19/01; "An Alternative to Hermit Crabs!" 4/19/01)

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Depth range based on 175 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 14 samples.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 0 - 150
  Temperature range (°C): 15.532 - 27.438
  Nitrate (umol/L): 0.174 - 6.698
  Salinity (PPS): 33.723 - 36.405
  Oxygen (ml/l): 3.888 - 5.755
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.076 - 0.423
  Silicate (umol/l): 0.756 - 2.933

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 0 - 150

Temperature range (°C): 15.532 - 27.438

Nitrate (umol/L): 0.174 - 6.698

Salinity (PPS): 33.723 - 36.405

Oxygen (ml/l): 3.888 - 5.755

Phosphate (umol/l): 0.076 - 0.423

Silicate (umol/l): 0.756 - 2.933
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

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Trophic Strategy

Food Habits

The diet of the Common Eastern Nassa consists mainly of carrion and some eggs of certain sand-dwelling polychaetes. The Nassa comes out of the sand to eat the carrion and, most of the time, it must move up-current to eat. Scientists and researchers are not sure if they are obligate carrion-feeders. Obligate carrion-feeders are those animals that will not harm most or all other animals in the systen in which they are living. ("Livestock" 4/28/01; "An Alternative to Hermit Crabs!" 4/19/01)

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Associations

Known predators

  • Christian RR, Luczkovich JJ (1999) Organizing and understanding a winter’s seagrass foodweb network through effective trophic levels. Ecol Model 117:99–124
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Known prey organisms

Nassarius vibex (Deposit-feeding gastropods) preys on:
algae
bacteria
Microfauna
meiofauna

Based on studies in:
USA: Florida (Estuarine)

This list may not be complete but is based on published studies.
  • Christian RR, Luczkovich JJ (1999) Organizing and understanding a winter’s seagrass foodweb network through effective trophic levels. Ecol Model 117:99–124
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Life History and Behavior

Reproduction

No information was found concerning the reproductive methods or habits of the Common Eastern Nassa.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

US Federal List: no special status

CITES: no special status

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Relevance to Humans and Ecosystems

Benefits

Economic Importance for Humans: Positive

No information was found that showed that the Common Eastern Nassa has any detrimental or beneficial aspects for the human population.

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Wikipedia

Nassarius vibex

Nassarius vibex, common name the bruised nassa, is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Nassariidae, the Nassa mud snails or dog whelks.[1]

Description[edit]

The length of the shell varies from 10 mm to 20 mm.

Distribution[edit]

Distribution of Nassarius vibex include range from 41.6°N to 27°S; 97.38°W to 34.9°W: northwest Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea, southwest Atlantic.[1]

This marine species occurs off the following countries:

  • USA: Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida: East Florida, West Florida; Louisiana, Texas[1]
  • Mexico: Tabasco, Veracruz, Campeche State, Yucatán State, Quintana Roo[1]
  • Nicaragua[1]
  • Lesser Antilles[1]
  • Costa Rica[1]
  • Cuba[1]
  • Panama[1]
  • Colombia[1]
  • Venezuela: Gulf of Venezuela[1]
  • Jamaica[1]
  • Virgin Islands: St. Croix[1]
  • Brazil: Para, Maranhao, Ceara, Rio Grande do Norte, Pernambuco, Alagoas, Bahia, Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Parana and Santa Catarina.[1]

References[edit]

This article incorprotates CC-BY-SA-3.0 text from the reference[1]

  • Cernohorsky W. O. (1984). Systematics of the family Nassariidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda). Bulletin of the Auckland Institute and Museum 14: 1-356.
  • Rosenberg, G., F. Moretzsohn, and E. F. García. 2009. Gastropoda (Mollusca) of the Gulf of Mexico, Pp. 579–699 in Felder, D.L. and D.K. Camp (eds.), Gulf of Mexico–Origins, Waters, and Biota. Biodiversity. Texas A&M Press, College Station, Texas.
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