Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Unarmed trees or shrubs. Leaves alternate, digitate. Inflorescence a terminal or axillary panicle or corymb. Flowers small, bisexual, 5-merous. Calyx minute, deeply lobed; stamens as many as petals. Ovary usually 5-lobed; ovule 1. Fruit a spherical 2-5-seeded drupe.
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Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:8
Specimens with Sequences:8
Specimens with Barcodes:8
Species:3
Species With Barcodes:3
Public Records:4
Public Species:1
Public BINs:0
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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Casimiroa

Casimiroa is a genus of flowering plants in the citrus family, Rutaceae. It includes about 10 species native to Mexico and Central America.[1] The genus is named for "an Otomi Indian, Casimiro Gómez, from the town of Cardonal in Hidalgo, Mexico, who fought and died in Mexico's war of independence." [2]

A general common name for plants of the genus is sapote.[3] Not all sapotes are members of this genus or even family, however; many sapotes are in the family Sapotaceae, especially the genus Pouteria, and the black sapote is part of the Ebenaceae.

Some species are cultivated. C. edulis (white sapote) produces edible fruit. It is also used as a shade tree in coffee plantations, as an ornamental, as an herbal remedy, and occasionally as lumber. C. sapota is grown in Mexico, and C. tetrameria is also known in cultivation.[4]

Species include:[5][6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Landaverde, N. A., et al. (2009). Anxiolytic and sedative effects of essential oil from Casimiroa pringlei on Wistar rats. J Med Plants Res 3(10), 791-98.
  2. ^ http://www.calflora.net/southafrica/1C-F.html
  3. ^ Casimiroa. Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS).
  4. ^ Morton, J. F. White Sapote. p. 191–96. In: Fruits of Warm Climates. Miami, Florida. 1987.
  5. ^ GRIN Species Records of Casimiroa. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN).
  6. ^ Casimiroa. The Plant List.
  7. ^ Casimiroa subordinate taxa. Tropicos.
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