Ecology

Associations

Flowering Plants Visited by Euschistus ictericus in Illinois

Euschistus ictericus Linnaeus: Pentatomidae, Hemiptera
(observations are from Robertson)

Apiaceae: Polytaenia nuttalli sn (Rb), Zizia aurea sn (Rb); Asteraceae: Rudbeckia subtomentosa sn (Rb); Fabaceae: Dalea purpurea sn (Rb); Lamiaceae: Pycnanthemum tenuifolium sn (Rb)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage: Euschistus ictericus

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 4
Species With Barcodes: 1
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Wikipedia

Euschistus ictericus

Euschistus ictericus is a North American species of shield bug. It grows up to 12 mm (0.5 in) long, and lives in damp areas.

Distribution[edit]

In Canada, E. ictericus is restricted to Ontario and Quebec.[1] In the United States, its distribution reaches as far south as Texas and Louisiana, and only as far west as Utah, despite previous reports that its range extended from coast to coast.[2]

Description[edit]

E. ictericus grows to a length of 10.5–12 millimetres (0.41–0.47 in),[2] and can be distinguished from other members of the "brown stink bug complex" by the lack of black spots in the middle of the ventral side of the abdomen, and by the presence of black rings around the spiracles on the abdomen.[3]

Ecology[edit]

E. ictericus lives in damp situations, on Carex comosa, Iris versicolor, Nymphaea odorata, Saururus cernuus, willows, Carduus horridulum, Heracleum maximum, Cuscuta, Glycine max, Vicia faba, Verbascum thapsus, Juncus, Perillus frutescens, polygonum densiflorum and Persicaria punctata.[2][4] It is attacked by Euthera tentatrix, Beskia aelops and Cylindromyia euchenor (Tachinidae) and by the eastern meadowlark, Sturnella magna.[2] E. ictericus is not economically important as a pest.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ H. Eric L. Maw (2000). "Family Pentatomidae". Checklist of the hemiptera of Canada and Alaska. Monographs – Entomology. NRC Research Press. pp. 145–149. ISBN 978-0-660-18165-3. 
  2. ^ a b c d John Edwin McPherson (1982). The Pentatomoidea (Hemiptera) of northeastern North America with emphasis on the fauna of Illinois. Southern Illinois University Press. ISBN 978-0-8093-1040-1. 
  3. ^ Jesus F. Esquivel, Roger M. Anderson & Robert E. Droleskey (2009). "A visual guide for identification of Euschistus spp. (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in Central Texas" (PDF). Southwestern Entomologist 34 (4): 485–488. doi:10.3958/059.034.0412. 
  4. ^ David A. Rider (October 28, 2009). "Euschistus ictericus (Linnaeus)". Plant Host Records: Pentatomidae: Pentatominae. North Dakota State University. Retrieved June 18, 2010. 
  5. ^ John Edwin McPherson & R. M. McPherson (2000). "Eischistus spp.". Stink bugs of economic importance in America north of Mexico. CRC Press. pp. 101–126. ISBN 978-0-8493-0071-4. 
Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Source: Wikipedia

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!