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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Rhizome erect or shortly creeping; rhizome scales linear to ovate, extending to the base of the stipe.  Fronds tufted or widely spaced, herbaceous to thinly coriaceous. Lamina pinnate to 4-pinnatifid, terminal pinna similar to lateral pinnae, basal pinnae often basiscopically developed, pinnae without powder on the undersurface; veins free, united in marginal vein bearing the sori, or variously anastomising with a costal areole.   Rhachis, costae and costules sometimes with spines on the underside.  Sori submarginal, covered by linear indusium, formed by the deflexed margin of the lamina, opening inwards.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Ecology

Associations

Foodplant / sap sucker
Idiopterus nephrolepidis sucks sap of live, curled, sometimes killed leaf of Pteris
Other: minor host/prey

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:283
Specimens with Sequences:283
Specimens with Barcodes:259
Species:67
Species With Barcodes:67
Public Records:175
Public Species:56
Public BINs:0
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Wikipedia

Pteris

Pteris (brake) is a genus of about 280 species of ferns in the Pteridoideae subfamily of the Pteridaceae.[1] They are native to tropical and subtropical regions of the world.

Many of them have linear frond segments, and some have sub-palmate division. Like other members of the Pteridaceae, the frond margin is reflexed over the marginal sori.

The term "brake", used for members of this genus, is a Middle English word for "fern" from southern England. Its derivation is unclear, and is generally thought to be related to "bracken", whereby the latter word has been assumed to be a plural, as with "children", and the former word a back-formation. However it may have a separate derivation.[2]

Selected species

Cultivation and uses

Some of these ferns are popular in cultivation as houseplants. These smaller species are often called "table ferns".

Pteris vittata (commonly known as brake fern) was discovered to have the ability to "hyperaccumulate" (absorb large amounts of) arsenic from soil. The fern was growing at a central Florida site contaminated with large amounts of copper arsenate in the soil. Dr. Lena Q. Ma of the University of Florida later discovered that it had hyperaccumulated considerable amounts of arsenic from the soil. The discovery may lead to the use of Pteris vittata as a potential bioremediation plant. [1]

References

  1. ^ Christenhusz, Maarten J. M.; Zhang, Xian-Chun; Schneider, Harald (18 February 2011). "A linear sequence of extant families and genera of lycophytes and ferns". Phytotaxa 19: 7–54. ISSN 1179-3163. http://www.mapress.com/phytotaxa/content/2011/f/pt00019p054.pdf.
  2. ^ J. Simpson, E. Weiner (eds), ed. (1989). "brake". Oxford English Dictionary (2nd edition ed.). Oxford: Clarendon Press. ISBN 0-19-861186-2.
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Source: Wikipedia

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