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Overview

Comprehensive Description

Description

Trees or shrubs. Leaves alternate, rarely subopposite or opposite. Cymes arranged in lax or dense panicles, ebracteate, terminal or axillary. Flowers bisexual or unisexual, actinomorphic. Calyx tubular or ± campanulate, usually splitting irregularly, 3-5-toothed, usually accrescent and cup-shaped in fruit. Corolla 4-5(-7)-lobed, funnel-shaped to salver-shaped, white or yellowish. Ovary 4-locular (abortive in male flowers). Style terminal, twice 2-fid with 4 slender or clavate, stigmas. Fruit drupaceous, partially or wholly surrounded by the enlarged persistent calyx.
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© Mark Hyde, Bart Wursten and Petra Ballings

Source: Flora of Zimbabwe

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Botanical Description

Bole: Small. To 15 m. Bark: Black. Slash: NR. Leaf: Simple. Alternate. Petiole: 0.6 - 3 cm. Lamina: Medium. 1.8 - 13.5 × 1.2 - 6.8 cm. Elliptic. Rounded. Acuminate. Glabrous above/hairy beneath. Domatia: NR. Glands: NR. Stipules: Absent. Thorns & Spines: Absent. Flower: Cymes in a terminal panicle. Fruit: Oblong-ovoid; sharply beaked; 1.4 cm long; 0.7 cm wide.
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Partner Web Site: Africa Tree Database

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Distribution

coastal Tanzania; Eastern Arc Mountains
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Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Cordia

Shrubs or trees and sometimes scandent shrubs. Leaves alternate, petiolate; blades simple; stipules absent. Flowers bisexual, usually heterostylous, in axillary or terminal cymes, panicles, corymbs, or spikes. Calyx campanulate or tubular, 5-dentate or 5-10 lobed, usually striate and accrescent in the fruit; corolla actinomorphic, campanulate or hypocrateriform; stamens 5, inserted on the corolla tube, shorter or longer than the corolla tube; ovary superior, bicarpellate, each carpel with 2 uniovulate chambers, the style branched into 4 stigmatic branches. Fruit a globose, fleshy drupe, with 1-4 pyrenes. A genus of about 300 species of pantropical distribution.

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Molecular Biology and Genetics

Molecular Biology

Statistics of barcoding coverage

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) Stats
Specimen Records:316
Specimens with Sequences:339
Specimens with Barcodes:276
Species:71
Species With Barcodes:61
Public Records:167
Public Species:42
Public BINs:0
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cordia aff.collococca

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cordia sp. 2836(R2T)

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cordia sp. 4564

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 0
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data: Cordia sp.

The following is a representative barcode sequence, the centroid of all available sequences for this species.


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Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Statistics of barcoding coverage: Cordia sp.

Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLDS) Stats
Public Records: 1
Specimens with Barcodes: 1
Species With Barcodes: 1
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© Barcode of Life Data Systems

Source: Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD)

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Barcode data

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Wikipedia

Cordia

For the automobile, see Mitsubishi Cordia.

Cordia is a genus of flowering plants in the borage family, Boraginaceae. It contains about 300 species of shrubs and trees, which are found worldwide mostly in warmer regions. Many of the species are commonly called manjack, while bocote may refer to several Central American species in Spanish. The generic name honours German botanist and pharmacist Valerius Cordus (1515-1544).[3] Like most other Boraginaceae, a majority have trichomes (hairs) on the leaves.

Uses[edit]

Ornamental[edit]

Many Cordias have fragrant, showy flowers and are popular in gardens, although they are not especially hardy.[4]

As food[edit]

A number of the tropical species have edible fruits, known by a wide variety of names including clammy cherries, glue berries, sebesten, or snotty gobbles. In India, the fruits of local species are used as a vegetable, raw, cooked, or pickled, and are known by many names, including lasora in Hindi. One such species is Fragrant Manjack (C. dichotoma), which is called gunda or tenti dela in Hindi and lasura in Nepali. The fruit of the Fragrant Manjack is called phoà-pò·-chí (破布子), 樹子仔, or 樹子(POJ: chhiū-chí) in Taiwan where they are eaten pickled.

Glue[edit]

The white, gooey inner pulp of the fruits is traditionally used to make glue. (citation?)

Wood[edit]

The wood of several Cordia species is commercially harvested. Ecuador Laurel (C. alliodora), Ziricote (C. dodecandra), Spanish Elm (C. gerascanthus), and C. goeldiana are used to make furniture and doors in Central and South America.[4]

Ziricote[5] and Bocote[6] are sometimes used as a wood for making acoustic guitar backs and sides. Well-known guitarist Richard Thompson currently plays a Lowden F-35C RT Richard Thompson Signature Model with Ziricote back and sides.[7] Similarly, drums are made from C. abyssinica, C. millenii, and C. platythrysa due to the resonance of the wood.[8]

Ecology[edit]

Cordia species are used as food plants by the caterpillars of some Lepidoptera species, such as Endoclita malabaricus, Bucculatrix caribbea, and Bucculatrix cordiaella.[9] The Wild Olive Tortoise Beetle (Physonota alutacea) feeds on C. boissieri, C. dentata, C. inermis, and C. macrostachya.[10]

Selected species[edit]

Formerly placed here[edit]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Cordia L.". TROPICOS. Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved 2009-10-20. 
  2. ^ "Cordia L.". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 2007-10-05. Retrieved 2010-03-01. 
  3. ^ Quattrocchi, Umberto (2000). CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names: A-C. CRC Press. pp. 612–613. ISBN 978-0-8493-2675-2. 
  4. ^ a b Bennett, Masha (2003). Pulmonarias and the Borage Family. Timber Press. pp. 196–198. ISBN 978-0-88192-589-0. 
  5. ^ http://www.lmii.com/CartTwo/thirdproducts.asp?CategoryName=+Backs+and+Sides&NameProdHeader=Ziricote Luthiers Mercantile page about Ziricote
  6. ^ http://www.lmii.com/CartTwo/thirdproducts.asp?CategoryName=+Backs+and+Sides&NameProdHeader=Bocote Luthiers Mercantile page about Ziricote
  7. ^ Presad, Anil (October 2009). "Richard Thompson" (PDF). Guitar Player: 50. 
  8. ^ Tudge, Colin (2007). The Tree. Random House. p. 237. ISBN 978-0-307-39539-9. 
  9. ^ Davis, Donald R.; Bernard Landry; Lazaro Roque-albelo (2002). "Two new Neotropical species of Bucculatrix leaf miners (Lepidoptera: Bucculatricidae) reared from Cordia (Boraginaceae)". Revue Suisse de Zoologie 109 (2): 277–294. 
  10. ^ Quinn, Mike. "Wild Olive Tortoise Beetle Physonota alutacea Boheman, 1854". Texas Beetle Information. Texas Entomology. Retrieved 2010-04-05. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h Grandtner, Miroslav M. (2005). Elsevier's Dictionary of Trees 1. Elsevier. pp. 252–260. ISBN 978-0-444-51784-5. 
  12. ^ "Cordia dichotoma Forst. f.". Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Plant Growth Facilities. University of Connecticut. 2009-10-06. Retrieved 2009-10-20. 
  13. ^ "Subordinate Taxa of Cordia L.". TROPICOS. Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved 2009-10-20. 
  14. ^ a b "Species Records of Cordia". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2010-08-21. 
  15. ^ "Cordia". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 1 March 2010. 
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