Overview

Distribution

Localities documented in Tropicos sources

Diplophyllum albicans (L.) Dumort.:
China (Asia)
Japan (Asia)

Note: This information is based on publications available through Tropicos and may not represent the entire distribution. Tropicos does not categorize distributions as native or non-native.
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National Distribution

Canada

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

United States

Origin: Unknown/Undetermined

Regularity: Regularly occurring

Currently: Unknown/Undetermined

Confidence: Confident

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Global Range: Estimated range greater than 1,000,000 square miles worldwide. Circumboreal distribution, mostly maritime but some populations inland. Canada (British Columbia, Yukon, Qubec, Maritime provinces), northern United States (Alaska, Washington, Oregon, Maine, probably others), Greenland, UK, Scandinavia, Europe, Russian far east, China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan.

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Ecology

Population Biology

Number of Occurrences

Note: For many non-migratory species, occurrences are roughly equivalent to populations.

Estimated Number of Occurrences: > 300

Comments: Estimated 1500 occurrences worldwide. The University of Alberta database has the most complete listing with 720 records worldwide. The ISMS database contains 90 records, representing about 92 sites.

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Conservation

Conservation Status

National NatureServe Conservation Status

Canada

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

United States

Rounded National Status Rank: NNR - Unranked

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NatureServe Conservation Status

Rounded Global Status Rank: G5 - Secure

Reasons: Diplophyllum albicans has a circumboreal distribution. Estimated 1500 occurrences worldwide. Estimated 300 occurrences worldwide with good viability. Estimated 100,000-1,000,000 individuals worldwide. Estimated range greater than 1,000,000 square miles worldwide. Estimated area of occupancy 1000 acres worldwide. Long-term and short-term trends relatively stable. Unthreatened as far as is known. Estimated at least 75 protected occurrences worldwide. Not intrinsically vulnerable. Narrow to generalist environmental specificity.

Environmental Specificity: Moderate. Generalist or community with some key requirements scarce.

Comments: Narrow to generalist environmental specificity. On rotting logs, bark, wet rocks and mineral soil, mostly in maritime regions. In organic substrates in late successional forests and on soil on streambanks and road cuts.

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Global Short Term Trend: Relatively stable (=10% change)

Comments: Short-term trend stable.

Global Long Term Trend: Increase of 10-25% to decline of 30%

Comments: Long-term trend relatively stable. In some regions possibly increased because of ability to grow on disturbed soil.

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Threats

Degree of Threat: Low

Comments: Unthreatened as far as is known. Local threats from logging. In addition to forest habitat, this species also grows on road cuts and is not dependent on old growth forests. This species is likely to persist as long as there are shady, cool, moist habitats.

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