Overview

Comprehensive Description

General Description

Bugula avicularia is an erect bryozoan, common to British waters. The species forms branched, bushy, fan-shaped colonies which grow to between 2-3 cm in height. The branches  of the colony are broad and flat, and when alive appear orange-brown in colour. The branches are arranged in a spiral formation around the main axis and divide dichotomously. Autozooids are rectangular or narrowing at the base.

Bugula avicularia mainly colonises other animals such as hydroids and other bryozoan species e.g. Flustra foliacea, which themselves may be attached to shells. Small modified zooids which resemble rootlets (Rhizoids) are used to attach to the colony to the substrate.

The species has been recorded from the intertidal zone, but is more common in subtidal waters down to approximately 100 m. It ranges from Shetland to Madeira, and can be found off all British coasts. It is also known to occur in the Mediterranean and the Red Sea, and potentially elsewhere, but is extensively confused with other species, especially B. stolonifera.

Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 3.0 (CC BY-NC 3.0)

© Natural History Museum, London

Source: Bryozoa of the British Isles

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Distribution

Op hydroïden en schelpen, waar, als bij B. flabellata, de onmiddellijke drager meestal een andere mosdierkolonie is zoals Flustra foliacea. In het KBIN zijn twee kolonies aanwezig op Flustra foliacea, beiden gedregd in 1905 (51°29’15”N- 2°32’45”O en 51°31’30”N-2°34’30”O). Geen recente waarnemingen uit de zuidelijke Noordzee. Faasse (1998) suggereert terecht dat vermeldingen uit Nederland van B. avicularia in Lacourt (1949), Heerebout (1970), Otten (1992), Platvoet et al. (1995), Faasse (1996) in havenmiddens Bugula stolonifera betreffen. Fig. 29 van ‘Bugula avicularia’ in Lacourt (1978) stelt duidelijk Bugula stolonifera voor, omdat de avicularia niet langer zijn dan de breedte van een zoïde. De melding in Katwijk, waarschijnlijk aangespoeld, in Maitland (1851) is goed aannemelijk, net zoals zijn opmerking ‘op korallijnen (mosdiertjes) aan de Hollandsche kust niet zeldzaam’.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Physical Description

Diagnostic Description

Description

Bossig, 2-3 cm hoog, takken spiraalsgewijs rond de hoofdas. Oranjebruin. Takken tweerijig. Zoïden rechthoekig of onderaan versmallend, bijna geheel het frontale oppervlak membraneus. Stekelformule 2:1. Polypide 13-15 tentakels. Avicularia groot, hun lengte overschrijdt de breedte van de dragende zoïde, vastgehecht op 1/3 of halverwege de laterale wand. Broedkamers bolvormig. Gele embryo’s van juni tot november. Vooral verward met B. stolonifera, die meer een soort van havens is.
  • De Blauwe, H. (2009). Mosdiertjes van de Zuidelijke Bocht van de Noordzee. Determinatiewerk voor België en Nederland. Uitgave Vlaams Instituut voor de Zee, Oostende: 464pp.
Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 (CC BY 3.0)

© WoRMS for SMEBD

Source: World Register of Marine Species

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Ecology

Habitat

Depth range based on 23 specimens in 1 taxon.
Water temperature and chemistry ranges based on 1 sample.

Environmental ranges
  Depth range (m): 5 - 1325
  Temperature range (°C): 9.968 - 9.968
  Nitrate (umol/L): 3.301 - 3.301
  Salinity (PPS): 34.633 - 34.633
  Oxygen (ml/l): 6.375 - 6.375
  Phosphate (umol/l): 0.435 - 0.435
  Silicate (umol/l): 2.118 - 2.118

Graphical representation

Depth range (m): 5 - 1325
 
Note: this information has not been validated. Check this *note*. Your feedback is most welcome.

Trusted

Article rating from 0 people

Default rating: 2.5 of 5

Disclaimer

EOL content is automatically assembled from many different content providers. As a result, from time to time you may find pages on EOL that are confusing.

To request an improvement, please leave a comment on the page. Thank you!